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The 1940 Under the Volcano

University of Ottawa Press | Canadian Literature Collection


The 1940 Under the Volcano—hidden for too long in the shadows of Lowry’s 1947 masterpiece—differs from the latter in significant ways. It is a bridge between Lowry’s 1930s fiction (especially In Ballast to the White Sea) and the 1947 Under the Volcano itself. Joining the recently published Swinging the Maelstrom and In Ballast to the White Sea, The 1940 Under the Volcano takes its rightful place as part of Lowry’s exciting 1930s/early-40s trilogy. Scholars have only recently begun to pay systematic attention to convergences and divergences between this earlier work and the 1947 version. Miguel Mota and Paul Tiessen’s insightful introduction, together with extensive annotations by Chris Ackerley and David Large, reveal the depth and breadth of Lowry’s complex vision for his work. This critical edition fleshes out our sense of the enormous achievement by this twentieth-century modernist.

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It is in every way a stunning job, clear, thorough, everywhere intelligent yet accessible not only for the Lowry scholar, but also for the general reader: a fine professional piece of work that should stand for many years as the definitive rendering of this important text.

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Malcolm Lowry was born in 1909 in northwest England, near Liverpool. During the 1930s he lived in London, New York, Mexico, and Los Angeles before moving to British Columbia in 1939. This move marked the start of a startlingly fertile period in Lowry's career as a 20th-century literary modernist. The 1940 Under the Volcano formed the basis for his masterpiece, Under the Volcano (1947)—one of the last great modernist novels.

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Miguel Mota is Associate Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. He has published on numerous 20th-century and contemporary writers and filmmakers.

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Paul Tiessen is Professor Emeritus at Wilfrid Laurier University. He is the founding editor of the Malcolm Lowry Newsletter (1977–1984) and The Malcolm Lowry Review (1984–2002).

 
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Interpreting the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal

University of Ottawa Press | Perspectives on Translation


In order to ensure its absolute authority, the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal (1946–1948), the Japanese counterpart of the Nuremberg Trial, adopted a three-tier structure for its interpreting: Japanese nationals interpreted the proceedings, second-generation Japanese-Americans monitored the interpreting, and Caucasian U.S. military officers arbitrated the disputes. The first extensive study on the subject in English, this book explores the historical and political contexts of the trial as well as the social and cultural backgrounds of the linguists through trial transcripts in English and Japanese, archival documents and recordings, and interviews with those who were involved in the interpreting. In addition to a detailed account of the interpreting, the book examines the reasons for the three-tier system, how the interpreting procedures were established over the course of the trial, and the unique difficulties faced by the Japanese-American monitors. This original case study of the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal illuminates how complex issues such as trust, power, control and race affect interpreting at international tribunals in times of conflict.

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“[an] invaluable historical [account] of interpreting in [a] clearly very sensitive [setting]”

- Jeremy Munday, Year's Work Critical and Cultural Theory Volume 20, Issue 1

 
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Academic Writing for Military Personnel

University of Ottawa Press


Academic Writing for Military Personnel is written for members of the military who are either new to or re-entering the academic community and who need to familiarize themselves with academic writing. The authors, an experienced writing instructor and a retired military officer, show how persuasive academic writing enhances officers’ effectiveness in their regular duties, especially as they reach more senior levels of service. They explain the differences between staff writing and academic writing, and outline some of the common errors military personnel make when transitioning from one to the other. The book’s chapters outline the value of strong written communication skills, the research process, the writing process, academic referencing, and frequent grammatical and syntactical errors. Specific examples chosen with a military audience in mind are integrated throughout the book to provide the reader with relevant and practical guidance. The book concludes with a discussion on how officers can use the knowledge they have acquired through their professional experiences in their academic work. As the only comprehensive guide to effective academic writing designed specifically for military personnel, this book will be a crucial addition to the libraries of junior and senior officers in militaries worldwide.

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"Using the unique perspective they have gained from both their academic experience and their direct involvement in the professional development of senior officers, Adam Chapnick and Craig Stone have created an eminently readable and practical guide to academic writing for military personnel. In so doing, they have rendered an invaluable service to the development of these competencies within the current and future cohorts of senior military personnel." -- LtGen (ret'd) Fred Sutherland

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"The prescriptions for writing are clear, and the format and organization make great sense. This book will be a tremendous asset to all." -- MGen (ret'd) Ivan Fenton

"In my former profession as an academic I read many books on academic writing over the years. This one ranks among the best." -- MGen (ret'd) Herb Petras

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"Academic Writing for Military Personnel is a short, focused, useful book... a welcome addition to the reference library of anyone in uniform." -- Canadian Air Force Journal

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Adam Chapnick is the deputy director of education at the Canadian Forces College, Toronto, and assistant professor of defence studies at the Royal Military College. He is the author of The Middle Power Project: Canada and the Founding of the United Nations (UBC Press, 2005).

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Craig Stone is the deputy director of academics at the Canadian Forces College, Toronto, and head of the Department of Defence Studies at the Royal Military College of Canada. Now retired, he served in the Canadian Armed Forces for over 30 years.

 
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In Ballast to the White Sea

University of Ottawa Press | Canadian Literature Collection


In Ballast to the White Sea is Malcolm Lowry’s most ambitious work of the mid-1930s. Inspired by his life experience, the novel recounts the story of a Cambridge undergraduate who aspires to be a writer but has come to believe that both his book and, in a sense, his life have already been “written.” After a fire broke out in Lowry’s squatter’s shack, all that remained of In Ballast to the White Sea were a few sheets of paper. Only decades after Lowry’s death did it become known that his first wife, Jan Gabrial, still had a typescript. This scholarly edition presents, for the first time, the once-lost novel. Patrick McCarthy’s critical introduction offers insight into Lowry’s sense of himself while Chris Ackerley’s extensive annotations provide important information about Lowry’s life and art in an edition that will captivate readers and scholars alike.

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“Under the Volcano follow-up In Ballast to the White Sea typed up from copy after manuscript was burned in a fire…The book was launched this weekend at The Bluecoat arts centre in Liverpool. Artistic director Bryan Biggs said it “provides the missing link between Lowry’s first, somewhat immature novel, Ultramarine, written while he was still a student, and his acknowledged masterpiece, Under the Volcano.”

– Alison Flood, “ ‘Lost’ Malcolm Lowry novel published for the first time,” The Guardian, October 26, 2014

Also articles in the UK News (October 29, 2014), LA Times (October 30, 2014); NPR (October 30, 2014);

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“What does In Ballast have that you don’t get elsewhere in Lowry? There is more dense, original, expressive writing, those primary transcriptions of reality that Lowry always – when he allowed himself – shone at. (…) Gorgeous, rhapsodic sentences, many of them turning on placenames (…) a kindly ability to incorporate impressions, references, knowledge (…) A shift of focus to things that were never central in any of Lowry’s previously published books (…) a masterpiece of doleful sports writing”

– Michael Hofmann, “Set up and put off,” The Times Literary Supplement, April 15, 2015

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“In recent years, Canadian modernist literature has been the subject of wide-ranging recovery

projects like Editing Modernism in Canada and the Canadian Writing and Research Collaboratory, many of which have been facilitated by digital platforms. Part of the Canada and the Spanish Civil War sub-series of the University of Ottawa Press’s Canadian Literature Collection, Best Stories is the second literary work brought out in print as part of spanishcivilwar.ca, a more holistic digital archival recovery platform. In addition to the context of Canadian modernist recovery projects, Sharpe’s collection engages in the global recovery of leftist literature. (...) Among Sharpe’s most skillful critical moves is a series of readings that contravene book reviews Garner’s self-construction. By evaluating Garner’s self-fashioning as one of the many texts that constitute Garner’s cultural impact, Sharpe allows the persona and the oeuvre to mutually inform one another. (...) Sharpe suggests that this repetition across fictional and nonfictional forms imbues the writing

with a realism based on the intertextuality within Garner’s written works, particularly in the case of the Spanish Civil War stories. The explanatory notes for the three stories on the Spanish Civil War are some of the most extensive in the collection, speaking to the richness of the stories’ historical context and to the linguistic, cultural, and international experience of the combatants they portray. (...) Sharpe’s edition provides a tidy, if implicit, parallel to Garner’s collection. Sharpe’s edition

fits into broader digital and print publications, draws together multiple critical contexts, and

features a writer whose work appeared primarily in Canadian venues. Thanks to Sharpe’s editorial treatment, Garner’s “multimedia production” across print, film, and radio spans outwards from the print instance of the stories; the multiplicity of international, Canadian, classed, gendered, and radicalized contexts emerge as networked connections across Garner’s short fiction. The connections of Canadian literary production and archival recovery to their international contexts come to light.”

– Emily Christina Murphy, Queen's University, Modernism/Modernity

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Malcolm Lowry was born in 1909 in northwest England, near Liverpool. During the 1930s he lived in London, New York, Mexico, and Los Angeles before moving to British Columbia in 1939. This move marked the start of a startlingly fertile period in Lowry’s career as a 20th-century writer. His masterpiece, Under the Volcano (1947), is one of the last great modernist novels.

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Patrick A. McCarthy is the author or editor of 11 books and monographs, over 50 scholarly articles, and numerous reference articles and reviews. He authored several studies on Lowry, including Forests of Symbols: World, Text, and Self in Malcolm Lowry’s Fiction; Malcolm Lowry’s “La Mordida”: A Scholarly Edition; and “Under the Volcano” in The Literary Encyclopedia.

 
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Le Quartier du Musée

University of Ottawa Press | Études régionales


Le Quartier du Musée, situé en face du Musée canadien

de l’histoire dans le secteur Hull de la Ville de Gatineau,

est le lieu d’origine identitaire des francophones de

l’Outaouais. 

Première paroisse catholique française de Hull avec ses bâtiments institutionnels, résidentiels et

commerciaux, le Quartier du Musée regroupe un

ensemble de références socioéconomiques et

historiques, plus particulièrement pour la société

catholique et canadienne-française de la région.

Un des rares témoins de la Ville de Hull d’avant 1900,

son patrimoine bâti ancien reflète l’adaptation des

divers courants architecturaux de la région de la

capitale nationale du Canada : 53 des bâtiments

de ce quartier datent d’avant 1910, alors que

44 précèdent l'incendie de 1900. 

Les brèves histoires des propriétaires et occupants

révèlent l’évolution de l’histoire sociale, économique et

culturelle de l’Outaouais. Les activités socioéconomiques

des habitants, propriétaires et locataires permettent de

mieux connaître les nombreuses personnalités qui ont

joué un rôle de grande importance dans l’histoire de la

ville et de la région.

Ce livre est publié en français.

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In Gatineau, the Quartier du Musée heritage neighbourhood regularly makes the news as it has been earmarked for large-scale development that would modernize the downtown area. Discover the 65 early-20th century buildings and their history. 

The Quartier du Musée is located in front of the Canadian Museum of History in the Hull sector of the City of Gatineau. It is at the heart of the the Outaouais Francophones’ identity. 

As the founding French-Catholic parish, with its institutional, residential and commercial buildings, the Quartier du Musée represents an ensemble of historical and socio-economical references, in particular for the Catholic and French-Canadian communities of the area. It is one of the rare neighborhoods still bearing witness to the City of Hull as it stood prior to 1900; as such, its built heritage reflects the way various architectural styles were adapted in the National Capital area: 53 of the buildings were built prior to 1910, and 44 were built prior to the Great Fire of 1900. 

The stories of the owners and occupants reveal the evolution of the social, economic and cultural history of the Outaouais. The socio-economic activities of the buildings’ inhabitants—whether owners or tenants— shed light on the key individuals who played an important role in the history of the city and of the greater area.

This book is published in French.

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Ce livre peut servir de guide puisqu’on peut aller dans le

secteur et être capable de voir chacune des maisons. On passe adresse par

adresse chacun des bâtiments du quartier du Musée. (…). L’ouvrage de Michelle Guitard

nous permet vraiment de découvrir ce quartier qui est un petit bijou.

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À quelques mois du vote concernant la citation patrimoniale du Quartier du Musée, le 28 août prochain, à Gatineau, l’historienne Michelle Guitard fait paraître Le Quartier du Musée, un livre portant sur l’histoire et l’architecture de cette première paroisse catholique française de Hull. (...) L’ouvrage présente toutes les constructions du quartier, leur style architectural, ainsi que leurs propriétaires et occupants.

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Une étude urbanistique à Gatineau de grande valeur.

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Michelle Guitard est historienne-conseil spécialisée en histoire du Canada du XVIe siècle jusqu’au milieu du XXe siècle. Elle a produit plus de 200 rapports de bâtiments historiques, à Gatineau et à Montréal.

 
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Braaaiiinnnsss!

Smith?, Robert (Hrsg.) | University of Ottawa Press


Think you know a thing or two about zombies? Think again. If you’re going to keep your wits – and your brains – about you during a zombie attack, you need expert advice. Braaaiiinnnsss!: From Academics to Zombies gathers together an irreverent group of scholars and writers to take a serious look at how zombies threaten almost every aspect of our lives. Spawned from the viral publication "When Zombies Attack!: Mathematical Modelling of an Outbreak of Zombie Infection," this multidisciplinary book draws on a variety of fields including biology, history, law, gender studies, archaeology, library science and landscape architecture. Part homage to zombie films and fiction, part cultural study, this collection humorously explores our deep-seated fear of the undead. Engaging and accessible, Braaaiiinnnnssss! will amuse academics and zombie fans alike.

 
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The Forgotten Peace

University of Ottawa Press | Governance Series


In the early hours of April 22, 1914, American President Woodrow Wilson sent Marines to seize the port of Veracruz in an attempt to alter the course of the Mexican Revolution. As a result, the United States seemed on the brink of war with Mexico. An international uproar ensued. The governments of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile offered to mediate a peaceful resolution to the crisis. Surprisingly, both the United States and Mexico accepted their offer and all parties agreed to meet at an international peace conference in Niagara Falls, Ontario.

For Canadians, the conference provided an unexpected spectacle on their doorstep, combining high diplomacy and low intrigue around the gardens and cataracts of Canada's most famous natural attraction. For the diplomats involved, it proved to be an ephemeral high point in the nascent pan-American movement. After it ended, the conference dropped out of historical memory.

This is the first full account of the Niagara Falls Peace Conference to be published in North America since 1914. The author carefully reconstructs what happened at Niagara Falls, examining its historical significance for Canada's relationship with the Americas. From this almost forgotten event he draws important lessons on the conduct of international mediation and the perils of middle-power diplomacy.

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"This significant and engaging work provides a cogent analysis of [the A.B.C.] conference, an often-ignored incident in the course of the Mexican Revolution and a fascinating example of incipient Canadian involvement in the affairs of the hemisphere that will be of great intereest both to historians of Mexico and inter-American relations." -- Canadian Journal of History

 
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Mathematical Modelling of Zombies

Smith?, Robert (Hrsg.) | University of Ottawa Press


In this terrible new COVID-19 world, the University of Ottawa is doing its part by offering a 50% discount on this very important book. We decided not to rewrite the witty book description, though we realize it is tone-deaf at the present moment, as we wanted to give readers a sense of the tone of this title. But don’t be deceived: while a fun read, this book will help you better understand how epidemiologists, governments and health care planners use mathematical models to figure out how quickly epidemics and pandemics spread, in order to plan appropriately. Reading has perhaps never been as important, and this book should be at the top of your reading list.

You’re outnumbered, in fear for your life, surrounded by flesheating zombies. What can save you now? Mathematics, of course.

Mathematical Modelling of Zombies engages the imagination to illustrate the power of mathematical modelling. Using zombies as a “hook,” you’ll learn how mathematics can predict the unpredictable. In order to be prepared for the apocalypse, you’ll need mathematical models, differential equations, statistical estimations, discretetime models, and adaptive strategies for zombie attacks—as well as baseball bats and Dire Straits records (latter two items not included).

In Mathematical Modelling of Zombies, Robert Smith? brings together a highly skilled team of contributors to fend off a zombie uprising. You’ll also learn how modelling can advise government policy, how theoretical results can be communicated to a nonmathematical audience and how models can be formulated with only limited information. A forward by Andrew Cartmel—former script editor of Doctor Who, author, zombie fan and all-round famous person in science-fiction circles—even provides a genealogy of the undead. By understanding how to combat zombies, readers will be introduced to a wide variety of modelling techniques that are applicable to other real-world issues (biology, epidemiology, medicine, public health, etc.).

So if the zombies turn up, reach for this book. The future of the human race may depend on it.

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WHY ARE SCIENTISTS SO OBSESSED WITH STUDYING ZOMBIES?

JUST BECAUSE ZOMBIES AREN’T REAL DOESN’T MEAN WE CAN’T LEARN FROM THEM

By Kate Baggaley January 11, 2017

When the zombie apocalypse comes, it will be swift and brutal. Within 100 days of the dead rising to feast on our flesh, only 273 people will remain. Or so suggests a grim estimate from students at the University of Leicester, published recently in the school’s Journal of Physics Special Topics.

Okay, zombies aren’t actually going to destroy the human race (probably). But that doesn’t mean we can’t study them. The new calculations are by no means the first example of a formal scientific investigation into the living dead.

There’s plenty of research on “real-world” zombies, animals whose minds have been taken over by parasites. But some take this zombie-science obsession to another level. Zombies have been used to help us understand how infectious diseases spread, teach us about math or neuroscience, and improve our efforts to prepare for real crises.

Zombie math

When using math to predict how an outbreak will play out, zombie survivalists must ponder questions like: how many people can a zombie attack in a day? How likely is it that those victims will be infected? How quickly can the zombies be killed? How will our population’s rate of zombification change as people become more skilled at killing or evading the undead? What happens if we find a cure?

Epidemiologists ask pretty similar questions when modeling real-world diseases. “All these things that you can play around with that are just as applicable to an influenza outbreak or a mumps outbreak—like we’re seeing in Arkansas right now—as they are to a zombie outbreak,” says Tara C. Smith, an epidemiologist at Kent State University in Ohio (and member of the Zombie Research Society).

So zombies can illustrate how a hypothetical illness might spread under different conditions. “It’s difficult sometimes to model diseases that we know,” Smith says. “We have all these parameters we have to fill in, and we think we know a lot about each of them, and sometimes we’re wrong.”

But with zombies, all bets are off. “You can have them spread only by bite, by mosquitoes, by air, you can have them have an incubation period of 30 seconds or five days,” Smith says. “You can make up everything, look at how that spreads, and look at how different prevention methods can play a role in mitigating the spread.”

A few scholars have done just that. In 2009, University of Ottawa mathematician Robert J. Smith? (yep, the question mark is part of his name) and his students showed that humans would have to strike back quickly and fiercely against the walking dead to avoid “the collapse of society as zombies overtake us all.” The class project grew into a chapter in a book about modeling infectious diseases.

Smith? went on to edit a book called Mathematical Modelling of Zombies. One chapter suggests that it’s better to buy time by running from a zombie horde than trying to slow it down. “Fleeing for your life should be the first action of any human wishing to survive,” the paper’s authors note.

Another tip: head for the Rockies. A team from Cornell University came up with a simulation for a zombie outbreak in the continental United States and worked out the best places to hide. The epidemic would quickly plow through cities, and most of us would become zombies in the first week. But four months later, remote parts of Montana and Nevada would still remain zombie-free.

“Zombies form a wonderful model system to illustrate modern epidemiological tools,” wrote the researchers, whose zombie model is a cousin of the SIR (susceptible, infected, and resistant) models used to understand many illnesses.

Their results were used to create an interactive map called Zombietown, USA, so you can start a zombie epidemic anywhere in America and watch it sweep the nation.

Zombie teachers

Epidemiologists and university students aren’t the only targets of zombie experts. Smith (yes, the one without the question mark) uses the undead to teach people of all ages about real sicknesses. “Most of the modern zombie tales, at least since 28 Days Later, really have focused on the zombie as a contagion, as an infectious disease,” Smith says. “So it’s a perfect way to talk about the spread of infection, how you control it, why you should vaccinate, and how you can prevent other real infections like influenza or measles.”

Zombies have also inspired brain research. Neuroscientists have considered how the zombie brain might deteriorate to cause symptoms like a shambling gait or ravenous hunger, and how some neurological diseases can resemble zombieism.

The Centers for Disease Control has even recruited zombies to teach the living about emergency preparedness. In 2011, the agency floated a blog post titled “Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse.” It featured the CDC’s usual advice about having a plan in case disaster strikes, but added the thrilling context of surviving a zombie attack. "If you're prepared for the zombie apocalypse, you're also prepared for hurricanes and flooding," CDC spokesperson Dave Daigle told Livescience.

The post was so popular that it crashed the blog’s servers nine minutes after the CDC tweeted it. But do zombies actually make good teachers? Researchers at Loyola University Chicago tried to find out. They showed people both the zombie post and more straightforward advice. The zombie group was more entertained, but not actually more likely to remember what they’d learned or put it into action.

This doesn’t mean there’s no place for zombies in public health. The undead popped up through the entire CDC blog post; it might have worked better if there were a clearer line between the funny business and serious tips, the researchers decided.

Zombie hijinks can also be mixed with more sobering advice. In 2015, Smith wrote about the history of zombie outbreaks in the British Medical Journal’s annual Christmas issue, which chronicles playful ideas tackled with scientific rigor. The cases she described, like those in 28 Days Later and The Walking Dead, were fictional, but her call for better funding and cooperation among the international community applies to real-world epidemics too.

“In 2014 we had this huge Ebola outbreak in West Africa. We’ve known about Ebola since 1976, but we were still completely unprepared,” she says (fortunately, the global response to this epidemic was not like that in the fictional World War Z).

“Even these pathogens that we’ve known about for many years, they can still surprise us. And we still don’t have any good way to respond globally very quickly, very nimbly, and to stop these pandemics before they happen,” Smith says. “We’re always one step behind each pathogen.”

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Without really intending, Robert Smith? appears to have accidentally created the subdiscipline of mathematical modelling of zombies. By day, he’s a professor of biomathematics at the University of Ottawa, studying infectious diseases such as HIV, human papillomavirus and various tropical diseases. By night, he’s a writer, having written or edited Outside In: 160 New Perspectives on 160 Classic Doctor Who Stories by 160 Writers (ATB Publishing, 2012), Who is the Doctor: The Unofficial Guide to the New Series (ECW Press, 2012), Braaaiiinnnsss: From Academics to Zombies (UOP, 2011), and Modelling Disease Ecology with Mathematics (American Institute of Mathematics Sciences, 2008).

 
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Recovering the Body

University of Ottawa Press


Following the metaphysical and epistemological threads that have led to our modern conception of the body as a machine, the book explores views of the body in the history of philosophy. Its central thesis is that the Cartesian paradigm, which has dominated the modern conception of the body (including the development and practice of medicine), offers an incomplete and even inaccurate picture. This picture has become a reductio ad absurdum, which, through such current trends as the practice of extreme body modification, and futuristic visions of downloading consciousness into machines, could lead to the disappearance of the biological body. Presenting Spinoza’s philosophy of the body as the road not followed, the author asks what Spinoza would think of some of our contemporary body visions. It also looks to two more holistic approaches to the body that offer hope of recovering its true meaning: the practice of yoga and alternative medicine. The metaphysical analysis is accompanied throughout by a tripartite historical and epistemological analysis: the body as an obstacle to knowledge (exemplified by Plato and our modern-day futurists), the body as an object of knowledge (exemplified by Descartes and modern scientific medicine); and the body as a source of knowledge (exemplified by the Stoics, and the philosophy of yoga).

- This book is published in English. 

 
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Yoko Tawada's Portrait of a Tongue

University of Ottawa Press | Literary Translation


Yoko Tawada's Portrait of a Tongue: An Experimental Translation by Chantal Wright is a hybrid text, innovatively combining literary criticism, experimental translation, and scholarly commentary. This work centres on a German-language prose text by Yoko Tawada entitled ‘Portrait of a Tongue’ [‘Porträt einer Zunge’, 2002]. Yoko Tawada is a native speaker of Japanese who learned German as an adult.

Portrait of a Tongue is a portrait of a German woman—referred to only as P—who has lived in the United States for many years and whose German has become inflected by English. The text is the first-person narrator’s declaration of love for P and for her language, a ‘thinking-out-loud’ about language(s), and a self-reflexive commentary.

Chantal Wright offers a critical response and a new approach to the translation process by interweaving Tawada’s text and the translator’s dialogue, creating a side-by-side reading experience that encourages the reader to move seamlessly between the two parts. Chantal Wright’s technique models what happens when translators read and responds to calls within Translation Studies for translators to claim visibility, to practice “thick translation”, and to develop their own creative voices. This experimental translation addresses a readership within the academic disciplines of Translation Studies, Germanic Studies, and related fields.

- This book is published in English. 

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Yoko Tawada (b. 1960) is an exophonic writer: a non-native speaker of German who writes prose, poetry and dramatic texts in her adopted language. She also writes in her mother tongue, Japanese. Tawada has been living in Germany since 1982 and learned the German language as an adult. Her signature short prose texts are part essay, part short story, and blur the boundaries between autobiography and fiction.

 
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