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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot in the War of 1812«

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The 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot in the War of 1812

Goose Lane Editions | New Brunswick Military Heritage Series


A long-awaited history of this important Canadian regiment, The 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot in the War of 1812 looks at this military unit from its beginnings in the early days of the 19th century to its disbanding in 1817. Best known for its perilous Winter March through the wilderness of New Brunswick to the battlefields of Upper Canada, the 104th was a British unit whose early role in the War of 1812 was to defend the Maritimes. In 1813, it was ordered to Upper Canada and took part in a raid on the American naval base at Sackets Harbor, New York. From there, they were sent to the Niagara Peninsula and fought in the Battle of Beaver Dams. Returning to Kingston, parts of the regiment fought in the Battle of Lundy's Lane and took part in the siege of Fort Erie, during which their commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel William Drummond, was killed. The 104th fought its last action at Lyon's Creek in October 1815. The end of the war in 1815 saw the regiment in Montreal, where it disbanded in 1817.

Although styled as a New Brunswick regiment, it drew its members from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Upper and Lower Canada, England, Scotland, and Ireland. The story of the 104th can be seen as a truly national endeavour, whereby "British Americans" in British North America, and Britons alike, defended those colonies from foreign aggression. After the war, many of the veterans remained in British North America and helped to build what would eventually become Canada. Today there are a few memorials, a bridge named in the regiment's honour, and a few artifacts, but the story of the 104th has largely been forgotten. The bicentenary of the War of 1812 has revived interest in this regiment — the only regular regiment of the British Army to be raised and employed on this continent during the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. This history of the 104th relies upon period correspondence, reports, diaries, and journals to describe the exploits of this famous unit.

The 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot in the War of 1812 is volume 21 of the New Brunswick Military Heritage Series..

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John R. Grodzinski is an assistant professor of history at the Royal Military College of Canada. He is the author of Defender of Canada: Sir George Prevost and the War of 1812 (University of Oklahoma Press, 2013) and editor of The War of 1812: An Annotated Bibliography (Routledge, 2007). He has contributed articles to a number of journals and has also authored chapters for several books. Grodzinski appeared in a PBS documentary on the War of 1812 in 2011, an episode of "Battlefield Detectives," and has been a commentator on the War of 1812 for the Discovery Channel and CBC Radio. He is a popular speaker and has addressed historical groups throughout Canada and in the United States. Grodzinski is also editor of the on-line "War of 1812 Magazine" and, over the last decade, has organized and led over 80 battlefield tours to sites related to the Seven Years' War, the American War of Independence, and the War of 1812. He lives in Kingston.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »All the Gold Hurts My Mouth«

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All the Gold Hurts My Mouth

Goose Lane Editions


Winner, 2017 ReLit Award

Katherine Leyton's fresh and vibrant debut collection takes on the sexual politics of the twenty-first century, boldly holding up a mirror to the male gaze and interrogating the nature of images and illusions.

Confronting the forces of mass communication — whether television, movies, or the Internet — Leyton explores the subtle effects of the media on our perceptions and interactions, including the pain of alienation and the threat of violence simmering just below the surface.

And yet, for all its unflinching and raw lyricism, the poetry of All the Gold Hurts My Mouth is warm and searching, full of humour and hope. Engaging her readers with lush vocabulary and spare, tightly controlled forms, Leyton's poems become a rich quest for identity, authenticity, and nature uncorrupted. Reaching gloriously from isolation and pain to connection with love, Leyton channels the wit of feminists past to create a manifesto for our time, an affirmation of what might be possible.

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"Leyton's voice is both enigmatic and unabashed, delving into the mysteries of selfhood while offering a vivid meditation on what it means to be a woman alive today. A fearless, urgent, and beautifully wrought debut."

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"An outstanding debut, filled with complicated yet still vivid imagery. Leyton's lines lift off the page to throttle you."

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"In this fierce debut, Leyton explores women as palaces and grand pianos, gleaming objects admired and shattered. Through her lyrically exuberant voice, whirring with musicality and subversive jabs, art becomes a looking glass. Just as 'women hum to drown their hunger,' these poems bring the salve of self-creation to their reader."

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"Katherine Leyton debuts with a brash, provocative collection centred around how women are seen by men, as expressed in popular culture, and how women internalize that male gaze."

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Katherine Leyton was the inaugural writer-in-residence at the Al & Eurithe Purdy A-Frame in the summer of 2014. Her poetry and non-fiction have appeared in numerous publications, including the Malahat Review, Hazlitt, the Globe and Mail, and the Edinburgh Review. She is also the founder of the highly unorthodox video poetry blog, HowPedestrian.ca. A native of Toronto, Leyton has lived in Rome, Montreal, Edinburgh, and Forli.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Walls«

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Walls

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Winner, Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, Wilfrid Eggleston Award for Nonfiction, and City of Calgary W.O. Mitchell Book Prize

Shortlisted, Dolman Travel Book Award

Longlisted, Alberta Readers' Choice Award, BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction, and Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

In this ambitious blend of travel and reportage, Marcello Di Cintio travels to the world's most disputed edges to meet the people who live alongside the razor wire and answer the question: What does it mean to live against the walls? Di Cintio shares tea with Saharan refugees on the wrong side of Morocco's desert wall. He meets with illegal Punjabi migrants who have circumvented the fencing around the Spanish enclave of Ceuta. He visits fenced-in villages in northeast India, walks Arizona's migrant trails, and travels to Palestinian villages to witness the protests against Israel's security barrier.

From Native American reservations on the US-Mexico border and the "Great Wall of Montreal" to Cyprus's divided capital and the Peace Lines of Belfast, Di Cintio seeks to understand what these structures say about those who build them and how they influence the cultures that they surround. Some walls define "us" from "them" with medieval clarity. Some walls encourage fear or feed hate. Others kill. And every wall inspires its own subversion, whether by the infiltrators who dare to go over, under or around them, or by the artists who transform them.

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"An illuminating, brilliantly composed book."

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"This is a remarkable book, and Di Cintio is a thoroughly engaged — and engaging — traveller and wordsmith. ... The walls Di Cintio visits show no signs of coming down, but the underlying human spirit — the small, defiant hopes and everyday heroism of the people faced with these barriers, and the communities along them that refuse to be cleaved — is, in its own strange way, uplifting."

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"Di Cintio is very good — honest, sharp, nuanced and vivid ... the descriptions of landscape and townscape are acute ... The historical asides are unobtrusive and erudite."

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"He shows how walls are counterproductive; they cast 'historical hatreds in concrete' or cause embattled communities to turn further in on themselves. ... If Di Cintio's book offers hope, it is rarely in expectation that his walls will be dismantled like Berlin's, but in the imaginative way these divisions have been subverted by art. Di Cintio concludes ... with the welcome conviction that the human desire to bring walls down is as strong as the instinct to build them up."

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"A perfect mix of fact and vivid first-person narrative leaves you feeling that you've witnessed death-defying acts of bravery, and fallen ill with Wall Disease. ... Walls is a humanizing history of the world's barricades that we need now more than ever."

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"Di Cintio's journeys successfully articulate the diminishing, humiliating effect of the walls on those who have no choice but to push against them."

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"Walls: Travels Along the Barricades offers unique perspectives on some of the most divided regions of the planet while forcing readers to ask the essential question, what side of the wall would they want to be on."

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"A collection of interrelated vignettes full of dense descriptions and fascinating characters that give the reader a true sense of place. ... Di Cintio's ethnographic method is the perfect approach to his subject. He is at the centre of his story, but this is far from gonzo journalism; instead, it is a deeply humane, honest, and even cautious account by an outsider who seeks as much as possible to understand local contexts. It is a story told from below that shows how everyday lives are affected by big-picture politics, and a challenge to our historical urge to construct order out of steel and stone rather than through dialogue."

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"What he does do, bravely and forcefully, and with impressive commitment, is to bear witness to the pain and suffering of people who live in the shadow of separation barriers."

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"Di Cintio's book is a travel book that takes its readers through many countries and gives them a sense of what it is like to live on one side of a wall and to experience the fragmentation and destruction of the landscape of one's country. He writes with passion and empathy for the victims of those monstrous walls that take no account of how they affect the human beings living next to them. ... if, in revealing the folly of building walls, his book, which won the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, helps to stop the spread of this affliction, it will have served a great purpose."

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"A beautifully written reportage, part travel, part history, part politics, full of acute observations and analysis. Recognizing that, as an outsider wielding a Canadian passport, he is in the enviable position of being able to pass through walls, Di Cintio makes meaningful connections with people on the ground to understand local contexts. The results are personal stories of living with walls, of subverting them and of defeating them, at once gripping, haunting, humorous and inspiring."

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"Di Cintio is best when considering the absurdities and oddities of border culture. ... Di Cintio is eloquent about the psychology of barriers. ... His language can be poetic and his perception acute."

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"Di Cintio brings a fair-minded, maple-baked sensitivity to the madness of dividing lines and barbed wire, but the effect is all the more saddening. If someone as uncholeric and sweet-tempered as Di Cintio found more despair than hope, it's not a good sign. Still, he writes well, unpicking some of the world's trouble spots in spare and lucid prose."

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"Most people, on both sides, now ignore the fence. But not Di Cintio. And that's his strength as a writer: he observes and reports tirelessly, then makes powerful and poetic connections between all that he has seen and heard. Walls is a moving and extremely engaging book, a reminder of 'the constant thrum of hope' amid so many man-made obstacles."

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"When Ronald Reagan exhorted Mikhail Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall, it was not only a political act. As Marcello di Cintio discovers, walls divide far more than nations. In this beautifully written reportage, the author brings readers the personal stories — gripping, haunting, humorous, and inspiring — of people living against walls around the world, from the 'peaceline' of Belfast to l'Acadie fence of Montreal."

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"What's it like having a physically massive, politically symbolic barrier for a neighbour? That's the question posed by this deftly written travelogue, which drops into settlements in Israel, Northern Ireland, Mexico and more to paint stark portraits of life beside some of the world's most notorious reinforced barriers."

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"At the heart of Di Cintio's book lies the practice of journalism, of finding people on both sides of the barriers, be they the nomadic Saharawi, African and Punjabi refugees in Ceuti or the gun-toting but surprisingly anti-fence redneck in Arizona, willing and often eager to share their experiences and lives. ... Di Cintio's willingness to go beyond mere reportage, to ponder his role in the story lifts it to an even higher level."

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"Walls is a book that follows its thread, that unpompously accepts the haplessness of being an outsider, and that is justly impatient with communities that hide behind a wall rather than ask difficult questions."

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"Walls is mostly a litany of tears, anger and woe, leavened by bitterly absurdist irony."

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"What is memorable in Walls is its deep pessimism. Whenever a dismantlement appears to be imminent, as in Nicosia, inertia and cynicism invariably win out over the let's-all-hold-hands anti-politics of the UN and the NGOs. In Belfast, Di Cintio notes the removal of the 'peace line' that once divided a park in Ardoyne but considers the underground wall that runs between the Catholic and Protestant sections of the Belfast City Cemetery to be 'a more relevant symbol than the image of little girls frolicking through a gate that opens every once in a while.'. The constructions of brick, concrete and steel that divide people are not only enduring but thriving."

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"Di Cintio leads a whirlwind tour of the world, looking at the unlikely places where human mania for erecting barriers has shown itself. Solid journalism that takes readers into cheerless, contested places that they probably would not wish to see for themselves. An eye-opener."

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"Honest, compassionate, and expertly written ... Marcello Di Cintio's new book is exactly the kind of non-fiction I adore most. It's ambitious, intensely personal, and uses one basic idea as the jump-off point for tackling all kinds of fascinating issues along the periphery. ... Walls is the kind of non-fiction you might call eye-opening, since it features Di Cintio travelling to all kinds of barricades around the world and interviewing the disparate people who live in their shadows. But he actually engages many more parts of the body than that — the brain and the heart both come to mind."

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"The book that results, packed with evocative stories of the folly of division, basks a little in (Canadian?) feelgood humanism. Some walls' foundations run deep. But as a colourful, compassionate tour of hot spots where 'nations stake territory in bald concrete', this beating of the bounds can't be topped."

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Calgary writer Marcello Di Cintio's book, Harmattan: Wind Across West Africa, won the Henry Kriesel Award for Best First Book. His second book, Poets and Pahlevans: A Journey Into the Heart of Iran, won the Wilfred Eggleston Prize. He has also written for numerous magazines and journals, including the Walrus, EnRoute, Geist, Reader's Digest, Afar, and the Globe and Mail.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Savage Love«

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Savage Love

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An Amazon.ca Best Book of 2013, A Globe and Mail Top 100 for 2013, and A Quill & Quire Best Book of 2013Longlisted, Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award

Savage Love marks the long-awaited literary return of one of Canada's most lauded and stylistically brilliant authors. Slyly holding forth with subversive wit, Glover skewers every conventional notion we've ever held about that cultural&emotional institution of love we are instructed to hold dear.

Peopled with forensic archaeologists, members of ancient tribes, horoscope writers, dental hygienists, butchers — Glover's stories are of our time yet timeless; spectacular fables that stand in any era, any civilization. Whether we be sexually ambiguous librarians or desperadoes of the most despicable kind, Glover exposes the humanity lurking behind our masks, and the perversities that underlie our actions.

Absurd, comic, dream-like, deeply affecting (on the molecular level): these stories revel in inventiveness yet preserve a strict adherence to the real. Glover directs his focus to moments when things seem too incredible to be supported, pointing us to truths that exhibit human nature in contexts we all recognize.

Savage Love marks the return of a master, with laugh-out-loud stories of the best kind, often completely unexpected, rife with moments of tragedy or horror. This is Douglas Glover country, and we are all willing visitors.

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"Douglas Glover always pushes the envelope. Every story in Savage Love is outrageous, creating farce — and something beautiful — out of human foibles.... Some paragraphs are so gorgeously vivid, I wanted to read them twice.... This is the kind of audacious work our literary juries should be acknowledging."

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"Savage Love takes twenty-first-century liberties to the max, refusing to succumb to an inner censor that resists exposure to what makes the sensitive uncomfortable. Love and lust, infatuation and infidelity, all the deep-down primal urges — Douglas Glover tackles every instinct with a bizarre spin or a brutal twist. This gifted author transfixes his audience with the unthinkable, drawing word pictures that some may prefer not to see in the middle of a lonely night. Illuminating.... Not for the timid, this gut-wrenching collection of physically and emotionally charged fiction lives up to the outstanding reputation that Glover has attained. His distinctive voice may echo into the next century and beyond."

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"In this book, Glover takes us far, far out into a vast sea of imaginative possibilities, shadows, violence, and twisted logic.... It is a world that is knowable in fragments, it's just that the fragments keep falling apart.... The stories growl off the page, as if read in the voice of an octogenarian Delta Blues master or one of the more recent Bob Dylan protagonists.... These stories resonate along complex frequencies that reward our best reading efforts."

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"Savage Love by Douglas Glover is a perfect collection of short stories for people knowing the world isn't a fairy tale. The stories are rough and frank but brutally honest about the concept of human relations."

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"I, your admiring reader, report myself ever again restored to find in hand the company of your righteous sentences, shout hooray, shout hooray, even splendid, splendid, splendid (borrowing from the great poet Jack Gilbert), like loins, he wrote, like Rome, he wrote.... "

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"Every story in Savage Love is outrageous, creating farce — and something beautiful — out of human foibles."

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"A Douglas Glover short story is like a 10-day journey by Soviet-era jeep over a nation's back roads — head-spinning and breathtaking. Its outcome is enlightening, sickening or utterly confusing, depending on which country he's taken you to.... The best stories in Savage Love ... inspire you to seize love by the heart and genitals, consequences be damned.... The frenetic chaos of Glover's writing gets richer as the stories go on, taking us deeper into the desires that fuel love in all its perversions."

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"Surprising, shattering, wickedly absurd tales rife with parenthetical, fourth-wall-breaking asides and understated cynicism ... Savage Love remains one of the strongest, most refreshing short fiction collections of 2013."

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"There is much that is provocative about Savage Love... Glover writes about love in various forms — philia, eros, and agape — but each word in the book's title should be afforded equal weight.... Glover is one of Canada's greatest stylists, and one of the most impressive aspects of Savage Love is the variety and range of registers he allows himself.... These stories engage in a process of aggressive defamiliarization, wrecking havoc with readerly sensibilities and exploring — deliberately and insistently — the extreme possibilities of language. Glover's collection is bracing, angry, violent and funny. It is, regardless of genre, one of the best books you will read this year.'

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"What unifies this collection is the characteristic excellence of Douglas Glover's prose. Otherwise the books is hugely, even shockingly varied in its narrative strategies, its settings, its tones, and its characters, who range from broadly comic figures to a killer so warped by war that he makes the psychotic Judge in Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian look benign. This book is urgent, ardent, obsessive, and remarkable."

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"These wildly creative tales reflect the ferocity of love, how the unexpected, forbidden, illicit and illegal play out on our psyches, how love begins and what is left when it abandons us.... this is love as you have never seen it before." — Best books of 2013 by Books Editor Laurie Grassi

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"One of Canada's best writers, Glover returns with a brilliant story collection displaying his considerable range and remarkably varied writerly gifts." — The Globe Books 100: Best Canadian fiction

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"Savage Love is an accomplished, funny, and inventive book that readers should rejoice in.... He's also a master of shifting between moods and modes... Through it all, the timing (so essential to comic writing), point of view, and diversity of language is near perfect.... By any measure, Savage Love deserves to be recognized as one of the best Canadian books published this year."

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"The stories in Savage Love ... were a revelation...relieved by moments of sardonic humour, as well as by the skill with which the stories are told ... If you have not read Douglas Glover before, I recommend you do."

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"Savage Love is an accomplished, funny, and inventive book that readers should rejoice in...the timing (so essential to comic writing), point of view, and diversity of language is near perfect . . . deserves to be recognized as one of the best Canadian books published this year."

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"A compact gallery, flint-eyed and snaggle-toothed, of wolfish behaviour; it's also a casebook study in narrative design...the stories smoulder and luminesce with vitiated heat, modulated light.... For all its antic form and interpersonal dysfunction, Savage Love remains somehow low key: a quietly virtuosic, artistically backward-looking story collection. Both eclectic and obsessive, abrasive and majestic, it might also be the best novel written anywhere this year.... Savage Love is Glover's fifth collection of short stories, and it confirms his longstanding mastery of the genre."

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"Glover's sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories pubilshed this year."

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"Savage Love provides more evidence: nobody alive constructs more perfect stories than Douglas Glover. His art is exquisite, conclusive, stainless — but also wide-awake and breathing. That is to say, he's no mere craftsman. In Savage Love, he manages somehow to be both Geppetto and the magic life-giving kiss."

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Douglas Glover was recipient of the 2006 Writers' Trust of Canada Timothy Findley Award for his body of work. His bestselling novel Elle won the Governor-General's Award and was a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. A Guide to Animal Behaviour was a finalist for the 1991 Governor-General's Award, and 16 Categories of Desire was shortlisted for the 2000 Rogers Writers Trust Fiction Award.

 
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What We Talk About When We Talk About War

Goose Lane Editions


An Amazon.ca Editor's Pick for 2012 and a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book of 2012

Shortlisted, Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction, Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, and John W. Dafoe Book Prize

Longlisted, Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

A provocative examination of how communications has shaped the language of the media, and vice versa, and how rhetoric shapes how Canadians thinks of themselves as a nation and Canada's engagement in peacekeeping, war, and on the international stage.

According to Richler, each phase of engagement in Afghanistan has been shaped not only by rhetoric but an overarching narrative structure. This topic is very much in discussion at the moment. With the withdrawal of Canadian troops (at least in part) from Afghanistan, it becomes clear there had been a rhetorical cycle. Where once Canada wielded the myth of itself as a peacekeeping nation, the past decade has seen a marked shift away from this, emphasizing the Canadian soldier as warrior. Yet now, as the country withdraws, the oratorical language we use steps away from heroes, able warriors, and sacrifice and back towards a more comfortable vision of Canada in a peacekeeping/training role.

In recent years, Canada has made large financial investments in the apparatus of war — in a manner it hasn't in a very long time — and as the realities of war are brought home (the losses, the tragedies, the atrocities, the lasting repercussions that come home with the soldiers who were on the front lines), Richler contends that it's crucial we understand our national perspective on war — how we have framed it, how we continue to frame it.

Using recent events to bolster his arguments, including the shooting of American congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and the earthquake in Haiti, Richler argues that very possibly the epic narrative of Canada is winding back down to that of the novel as we slowly regain our peacekeeping agenda.

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"The book offers considerable meat to chew. ... I can't agree with all of Richler's analysis, but I am grateful he has raised some important issues that have not been, but should have been, fully debated in Parliament and in the rest of the country this past decade."

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"The eloquent writing studded with unusual, but 'stressing' words makes this book a page-turner for those who believe that peace leads to advancement of civilization and prosperity. ... This is an invaluable and erudite book that should be in every public and private library."

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"Richler must have anticipated polarizing his readers ... One can't agree with everything in it, but with its challenging ideas and provocative theme, it's worth the effort. If this book does not fire a debate, then it will be because we are not up for it."

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"Anyone looking for an argument about something important would be well served to pick up What We Talk About When We Talk About War, Richler's provocative and ambitious new book."

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"A hard-hitting polemic aimed at the new 'philistines' laying siege to Lester B. Pearson's legacy of liberal internationalism and peacekeeping ... Richler's War catapults him to the front line of the ongoing Canadian culture war. He brings to the task the unique talents and perceptions of a novelist. It's rare to find in Canadian political discourse precise references to Homer's The Iliad and the Trojan War."

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"An epic tale in the style of Greek mythology ... I'm glad to have read it. It won't likely resurrect Pearsonian peacekeeping, but it may help us imagine an alternative more suited to the 21st century."

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"Richler's description and analysis of how and by whom such an epic story has been promulgated in Canada is nothing short of masterful. ... It must be said that this is an important contribution to the ongoing struggles of peace and violence within the hearts of individuals and the political ethos of a nation."

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"Definitely a book that will get people talking and turn a few heads, I couldn't recommend it more."

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"Richler argues that the Canadian public has not been all that supportive or interested in the war in Afghanistan. He offers proof in the huge outpouring of sympathy and aid to Haiti. ... a great book for the peace movement to use. ... What We Talk About When We Talk About War lays the ground for what we must be talking about when we talk about peace."

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"Richler wants to make us think and then talk about what we've learned. There is a wealth of information here that is designed to wake us up to the dangers of accepting war as a part of the Canadian psyche just because the government says it is so. ... He wants us to realize it is too easy to create a false image of the glory of war which leads to acceptance of its inevitability and appropriateness. ... This book is not just criticism, it finishes with some realistic and positive suggestions for establishing an effective peace. It would be a worthwhile read for any concerned Canadian."

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"It is heartening, then, to find a book such as Noah Richler's that connects the dots between government policies, media attitudes and public ceremonies, and asks several uncomfortable questions about whether our country has permanently abandoned its previous stance in the world as peacekeeper for the more aggressive status of a 'warrior nation,' and if so, what the consequences will be for our civil liberties and freedom of expression."

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"It's a rare accomplishment to write a book in which even people on the author's side can find something to quibble with on every second page. That outcome, however, is not only inherent in what Richler wrote, but is the chief achievement of this densely textured work. For his argument is as literary as it is political: it's about words. ... As Richler points out, Canadians want an idealistic motive (building schools for girls, say) for war. The result is incoherence about our presence in Afghanistan, and much of the nation simply turning its face away. Six years after the Prime Minister famously promised never to 'cut and run' there, we are about to do precisely that. Time, Richler says, to talk about it honestly."

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"A scathing attack that won't sit well with veterans ... [Richler] urges readers to cut through the 'epic' talk that surrounds war and see it as it truly is: hell."

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"What We Talk About When We Talk About War is an eloquent meditation on the nature of modern warfare, and one of the best books I've read about Canada in years — not the surprisingly colourful, forgotten history of, but a biting analysis of who we are in the twenty-first century. and why. ... So we are living in epic times. By identifying a sea change in the Canadian political psyche, Noah Richler identifies the spirit of our times, opens an important discussion. ... Don't leave this one to the critics. Buy the book, sink back, get mad and enjoy."

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"Richler assembles his evidence from a dizzying array of sources ... [His] opponents should welcome this new, sharply framed chance to make their case over and against his passionate polemic, about what Canada — which has both fought wars and kept the peace — has been, is now, and ought to be in the future."

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"Provocative and well-researched ... [Richler] has raised some important issues that have not been, and should have been, fully debated in Parliament and in the rest of the country this past decade."

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"It may be a polemic, but Richler's book is a decidedly literate one ... Richler's argument is backed by a mind-boggling amount of literary references. Using everything from ancient myths to modern literature about war, the author shows how storytelling shapes a nation's identity."

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"In this thought-provoking and erudite work, Richler explores what he sees as a fundamental shift in Canadian politics, discource and identity ... [Richler] reveals that in the aftermath of Afghanistan, Canadians may once more need to rethink who we are and what we believe."

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"Richler's points are thought-provoking and perceptive ... well worth considering."

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"There is a wealth of information here that is designed to wake us up to the dangers of accepting war as a part of the Canadian psyche just because the government says it is so ... Richler's eloquent review of the history of a nation forged in trade, treaty, compromise and peace refutes this presumption."

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"Noah Richler has raised serious questions about how Canada's elites, including major newspaper columnists, have embraced a more warlike national identity, less peacekeeping, and a more aggressive Canadian military."

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"A book worthy of joining some of the greatest examinations of human behaviour."

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"Richler's important and very readable book deserves high praise for showing us in detail how language is constantly misused by this government and its supporters. And Richler may well have enabled us to see, for once ahead of time, how a legitimate love of country can easily be distorted for narrower, partisan ends."

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One of Canada's public intellectuals, Noah Richler was a prize-winning producer and host of documentaries and features at BBC Radio before he returned to Canada in 1998 to join the founding staff of the National Post as its first books editor and later as a literary columnist. He has written for CBC Radio's Ideas, for the Op-Ed and cultural pages of the Globe & Mail, the Toronto Star, and the National Post, and for the Walrus, MacLean's, and EnRoute, for which he has won several national magazine awards. He is the author of This Is My Country, What's Yours? A Literary Atlas of Canada, finalist for the 2006 Nereus Writer's Trust Non-Fiction Prize and winner of the 2007 British Columbia Award for Canadian Non-Fiction. He lives in Toronto and in Digby, Nova Scotia.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Precious«

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Precious

Goose Lane Editions


Douglas Glover's raucous first novel was a finalist for the Books in Canada First Novel Award and sold out its first and only print run in just one month. Now mystery fans and readers of literary fiction alike can once again enjoy this witty post-modern detective tale by the author of Elle. The eponymous central character in Precious is a boozy, burned-out reporter with an embarrassing nickname and a penchant for getting into trouble. After three failed marriages and a humiliating stint in a Greek jail, he will do anything for the quiet life. A job as woman's page editor for the Ockenden Star-Leader seems like just the ticket — that is, until town gossip Rose Oxley winds up dead with a pair of scissors lodged in her chest. Suddenly Precious finds himself embroiled in a hilariously over-the-top murder mystery, brimming with delicious satire about the newspaper business and culminating in a characteristically outrageous Gloverian showdown with firearms, snowmobiles, and booze. Inviting comparisons with the novels of Jasper Fforde and Ross MacDonald, Precious deftly combines an ingenious literary parody with the plot of a richly satisfying mystery.

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"Sheer high spirits make it a jolly Canadian extravaganza."

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Douglas Glover was recipient of the 2006 Writers' Trust of Canada Timothy Findley Award for his body of work. His bestselling novel Elle won the Governor-General's Award and was a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. A Guide to Animal Behaviour was a finalist for the 1991 Governor-General's Award, and 16 Categories of Desire was shortlisted for the 2000 Rogers Writers Trust Fiction Award.

 
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Hurricanes

Goose Lane Editions


In 1954 Hurricane Hazel caused such destruction around Lake Ontario that it's a vivid memory half a century later. In 2003 Hurricane Juan so devastated the Halifax, Nova Scotia, area that complete recovery will take decades. In the fall of 2005, Hurricane Katrina, immediately followed by Rita and Wilma, held North America and the world spellbound. In fact, 2005 was a record breaking year for tropical storms, with four Category 5 hurricanes, seven tropical storms before August 1, the strongest hurricane in the Atlantic basin, and the costliest and third deadliest hurricane in US history. Yet few people know more about hurricanes than the horror they witness in the media. What are hurricanes? How are they formed, and where do they get their names? What should you do if a hurricane is headed in your direction? An indispensable reference book, Hurricanes: What You Need to Know answers these questions and more by combining science with handy tips, quick facts, checklists, satellite images, photographs and stories about some of North America's most devastating tropical storms.

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"This book is an excellent source of information."

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"A valuable survival guide."

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Rebecca Leaman lives in Fredericton and owns her own editorial business.

 
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The Elephant Talks to God

Goose Lane Editions


The Elephant Talks to God is an endearing collection of whimsical tales in which a young elephant forages for answers to that age-old existential puzzle: What is the meaning of life? In this new edition of Dale Estey's best-selling book, this pachyderm philosopher asks questions and God answers — sometimes cryptically, sometimes humorously but always with love and patience. The answers unfold in a series of conversations between this humble, though occasionally impertinent, beast and the Almighty. The free-ranging exchanges between the two include contributions from popes, missionaries and various monkeys, birds and insects. This sweet, sometimes satirical, and occasionally moving story will appeal to readers of all ages. The book includes most of the original stories from the popular 1989 collection as well as many new ones. Original, fresh and unsentimental, The Elephant Talks to God belongs on the bookshelves of anyone who, just like the inquisitive elephant, has ever wondered about life, love and the true nature of happiness.

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"Dale Estey's elephant is curious and whimsical and a little bit impulsive, but it still stays on the path and gets there one step at a time."

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"This book has much in common with prayer which is the art of paying attention to one's life. Without moralizing, it moves respectfully through whimsy, sensuality, intellect, intimacy and mystery. Like the biblical book of Job it opens into the inscrutable and wondrous heart of things. For anyone willing to go there, this is a good book."

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"If Aesop had been one of the Old Testament prophets or one of the New Testament apostles, The Elephant Talks to God is the book he would have written. ... Anyone who has ever wondered what Mother Goose tales and the Parables of Christ share in common will find the solution in this witty, whimsical book. May God bless Dale Estey and this beautiful testament."

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"A witty, satirical book about the relationship between mortals and an immortal creator."

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Dale Estey is a writer, teacher, arts activist, and the author of two other works of fiction, the popular fantasy thrillers The Bonner Deception and A Lost Tale. Estey's broad scope ranges from the fantasy setting of unicorns and druids in the A Lost Tale trilogy to the 9/11 destruction of New York. He has filled in the missing diaries of Franz Kafka, recounted the first person dementia of a serial killer, explored the outrageous lifestyle of the famous, and listened in while an elephant and God converse. He is currently working on the saga of a family of onion farmers, from Third century Italy to the present day. Dale Estey has lived in Fredericton and Saint John, New Brunswick, and now makes his home in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. Estey prefers to travel by train, but has embraced the computer age with a passion. He is currently on the hunt for unique onion recipes.

 
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The Violin Lover

Goose Lane Editions


Set in Jewish London in the 1930s, Susan Glickman's The Violin Lover is written against the backdrop of Hitler's escalating campaign against the Jews. This beautifully written novel tells the story of Clara Weiss and Ned Abraham, "the violin lover," brought together by Clara's 11-year-old son, Jacob. A successful doctor and amateur violinist, Ned is pressured to practice a duet with Jacob by the boy's piano teacher. Though reluctant at first, Ned is charmed by the young prodigy and surprised by Jacob's dedication and passion for music. In him Ned sees his younger self, so young and full of promise. A friendship is soon built on a mutual love for music. A dinner invitation to spend Passover with the Weiss family seals Ned's fate and a clandestine love affair begins. Although they both agree that no one must ever know — especially not Clara's family — their affair inevitably comes to a crashing end, with disastrous, life-altering consequences. Unfolding like a melody, The Violin Lover is infused with music and told in three voices. It is a powerful novel about the love one feels for family, friends, culture, faith and music, and the passion that comes with it — regardless of the outcome.

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"The Violin Lover is a beautifully written novel, one that fans of violin music, as well as readers of serious literary fiction, will particularly appreciate."

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"Dividing the novel into three parts, Glickman masterfully structures The Violin Lover in sonata form, mirroring and reflecting the musical narrative themes that underpin the book ... Glickman's mastery and maturity are evident in The Violin Lover. Its final moments are as moving and inevitable as the flow of music toward its conclusion. Readers will be richly rewarded by the beauty and power of her artistry."

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Born to Canadians living in Baltimore, MD, Susan Glickman convinced her parents to move home to Montreal at the age of one and a half. But that initial sense of being from somewhere never left her. She has lived in England, the United States, and Greece and extensively travelled across Europe, Asia, and America before settling in Toronto. Glickman's love for travel is matched by her love for books. She has worked in bookstores, in publishing, and as an English professor at the University of Toronto. Known for her lithe, rich poetry and brilliant literary criticism, Susan Glickman is the author of five highly regarded poetry collections, including Running in Prospect Cemetery: New & Selected Poems. Her critical study, The Picturesque and the Sublime: Poetics of the Canadian Landscape, won both the Gabrielle Roy Prize and the Raymond Klibansky Prize. Susan Glickman has been described as one of the finest of Canadian authors. She is a confident, gifted writer whose poetry and fiction exemplify beauty, insight, and power.

 
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Dance the Rocks Ashore

Goose Lane Editions


Lesley Choyce writes rings around most Canadian authors. And in this collection, we have choice Choyce.

Dance the Rocks Ashore contains substantial stories including "Dance the Rocks Ashore," a bittersweet account of an elderly couple's decline; the hilarious and bizarre "My Father Was a Book Reviewer" "The Third or Fourth Happiest Man in Nova Scotia," with a peculiar hero reminiscent of Noah; and "The Wreck of the Sister Theresa," in which spring fever hits like "a handshake in hell." Favourite stories from previous books include "Losing Ground," the pivotal chapter in Choyce's acclaimed 1989 novel The Second Season of Jonas MacPherson,as well as "The Cure," "Dancing the Night Away," and the complex and disturbing "Conventional Emotions."

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"As refreshing and unpredictable as those Atlantic waves he's so fond of riding."

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"By turns impish, poignant, and forceful."

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No one has a clearer view of Atlantic Canada's literary endeavours over the past twenty years than Lesley Choyce. He is the founder of the literary journal Pottersfield Portfolio, and the publisher of Pottersfield Press. He has edited several fiction anthologies and has been the in-house editor of many books from Pottersfield Press including Making Waves, a collection of stories by emerging authors from Atlantic Canada. He is the author of more than fifty books in genres ranging from poetry and essays to autobiography, history and fiction for adults, young adults, and children. Among his recent books are the novels The Republic of Nothing, World Enough, and Cold Clear Morning, and the story collection Dance the Rocks Ashore. Choyce is the writer, host, and co-producer of the popular literary show television program, Off the Page with Lesley Choyce, which is broadcast across the country on Vision TV. He also teaches in the English department of Dalhousie University in Halifax and is leader of the rock band The Surf Poets.

 
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