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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »F-Bomb«

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F-Bomb

Goose Lane Editions


Shortlisted, 2018 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize

From pop icons to working mothers, women are abandoning feminism in unprecedented numbers. Even scarier, they are also leading the charge to send it to its grave. Across North America, women head anti-feminist PR campaigns; they support anti-feminist politicians; they're behind lawsuits to silence the victims of campus rape; they participated in Gamergate, the violent, vitriolic anti-women-in-technology movement; and they're on the frontlines of the fight to end abortion rights. Everywhere we turn there's evidence an anti-feminist bomb has exploded, sometimes detonated by the unlikeliest suspects. Between women who say they don't need feminism and women who can't agree on what feminism should be, the challenges of fighting for gender equality have never been greater.

F-Bomb takes readers on a witty, insightful, and deeply fascinating journey into today's anti-feminist universe. Through a series of dispatches from the frontlines of the new gender wars, Lauren McKeon explores generational attitudes, debates over inclusiveness, and differing views on the intersection of race, class, and gender. She asks the uncomfortable question: if women aren't connecting with feminism, what's wrong with it? And she confronts the uncomfortable truth: for gender equality to prevail, we first need to understand where feminism has gone wrong and where it can go from here.

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"Now comes F-Bomb, in which Lauren McKeon ventures to interview and understand women vociferously against feminism. It gets ugly, but she handles it with aplomb."

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"However you define feminism, read this book. McKeon’s chronicle of our collective Conditions of Persistence reveals the ravages of exclusion, organized opposition, and denial. This compassionate airing of our failings clears the ways forward. Race, privilege, gender, sexuality; the work to be done, your invitation to the conversation, is here."

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"F-Bomb is a wonderfully uncomfortable peek into the lives and perspectives of folks who need to be seen, heard, and understood for the good of the feminist movement. McKeon mixes deep introspection with a s#!tload of research to bring us a much-needed commentary that will both anger and inspire you."

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"Lauren McKeon’s F-Bomb is the antidote to feeling at a loss for examples of why intersectional feminism is so very urgently needed now. With a journalist’s attention to research and context, an activist’s drive for meaningful action and policy-change, and a memoirist’s craft, McKeon has written a necessary call to action."

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"McKeon’s interviews and research shed much-needed light on feminism via its most ardent critics."

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"In absorbing passages that evoke the seduction and subterfuge found in spy thrillers, McKeon chronicles her encounters with female leaders of men’s rights groups."

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"F-Bomb isn’t a typical creative non-fiction or narrative book — it’s blunt, honest and well-researched. It’s the book to read on the current political climate."

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"In a manner that is both personal and unpretentious, McKeon deftly critiques more palatable ‘empowerment’ and ‘choice’ narratives of feminism, and demonstrates why our feminism(s) must be intersectional, embrace difference, and begin with compassion."

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"McKeon proves a trustworthy and entertaining guide taking us through the tangled mess of lies, deliberate misunderstandings, and sad self-centredness that characterize the groups arrayed against the progress of feminism."

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Lauren McKeon was the editor of Canada's progressive, independent This Magazine from 2011 to 2016. While at This, Lauren helmed one of the bestselling issues in recent years, "Why Canada Need More Feminism," and also organized a sold-out event on the topic, which headlined a diverse, intersectional roster of speakers. Before leading "This," Lauren worked as a reporter, editor and writer in the North for several years, living in Yellowknife and travelling Canada's territories and northern Alberta.

Today, she is the digital editor at The Walrus and a contributing editor at Toronto Life, where she wrote about her experiences with sexual assault in 15 Years of Silence. In response, Lauren has heard from dozens of women around the world who've shared their own experiences — some for the first time — and was prominently featured in the documentary PTSD: Beyond Trauma, which aired in January 2017 on David Suzuki's The Nature of Things.

Lauren's personal essays, which tackle the world and her experiences through a not-so-rosy feminist lens, have twice been featured on Longreads.com, a popular site dedicated to "helping people find and share the best storytelling in the world." Her long-form writing has won her several Canadian National Magazine Awards, including four honorable mentions, one silver, and in 2015, a gold in the personal journalism category for her Toronto Life piece "Save me From My Workout."

Lauren writes for Hazlitt, Flare, Reader's Digest, and TVO.org.  One of her essays also appears in Best Canadian Essays 2017.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Conspiracy of Hope«

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Conspiracy of Hope

Goose Lane Editions


An explosive book that exposes the truth about breast cancer screening.

For decades, women have been told that mammograms save lives. Yet many scientists say that this is in fact not true. Conspiracy of Hope reveals how breast cancer screening was introduced in the US before there was any good evidence it made any difference, and an unfounded belief in early detection caught on quickly in Canada and other developed countries. Today the evidence is starkly clear. Screening does more harm than good. Still women, and their doctors, continue to buy into a myth perpetuated by greed, fear, and wishful thinking.

Conspiracy of Hope illustrates how a vortex of interests came together to make breast screening standard medical practice and why it's so hard to persuade them they are wrong. The radiologists, the imaging machinery manufacturers, and the pink ribbon charities are all part of that story. It is a tale of back-stabbing and intrigue, of exploiting fear and hope, while distorting and misrepresenting the evidence. Or simply ignoring it.

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"If you've ever wondered why mammography screening has been the target of fierce debate for thirty years running,read this book. Renée Pellerin exposes how the early detection mantra has always been a mix of good intentions,magical thinking, and flim-flam. What it is has never been is full-on science. The balance of evidence on screening mammography weighs heavily toward lesser benefit and more harm than anyone ever wanted to believe. Conspiracy of Hope chronicles how belief born from hope and perpetuated by vested interests can be hard to shake,even when confronted with a wealth of research."

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"Everyone who has been touched by breast cancer should read Pellerin's meticulously researched book. Pellerin knows the science better than many of the doctors in whose hands women have placed their trust."

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"Renee Pellerin has written a careful and convincing story of a group of courageous scientists and researchers who challenged the dogma of breast cancer screening and the powerful groups that have overstated its value."

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Renée Pellerin is a former television and radio producer with CBC. For many years, she was a documentary producer for Marketplace, specializing in investigative health stories. She was also a producer at the Fifth Estate, consultant to the CBC Newsworld program Health Matters, executive producer of a documentary unit at CBC Newsworld, and a producer at Morningside and Sunday Morning. Before she left CBC, she was the head of the Health Content Unit for CBC News, leading a team of health journalists in radio, TV, and online.

Pellerin has won several national and international awards for her work, including a Michener Citation of Merit for public service in journalism. She has also taught journalism at the National University of Rwanda in Butare and at Ryerson University in Toronto, and has held the visiting chair in journalism at the University of Regina. She holds degrees from the University of Saskatchewan and University of King’s College in Halifax. She now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Bast's Warrior«

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Bast's Warrior

BWL Publishing Inc. | Alternate Egypt


Tira flees a threat to her life and encounters two elderly women who offer her the chance to be sent to an alternate ancient Egypt with no thought of return. She has had a fascination with Egypt and can even read hieroglyphics. Once there she will be given a task. Failure could mean death. Dare she take the chance and can she find the lost symbols of the rule before an enemy finds them? Kashe, son of the nomarch of Mero is in rebellion. His father desires him to join the priesthood of Aken Re, a foreign god. He feels he belongs to Horu, god of warriors and justice. He decides to leave home, meets Tira and joins her in the search for the symbols of the rule. Will his aid bring good fortune and will their growing love keep them from making a fatal mistake?

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This engaging voyage into an ancient Egypt that includes power-hungry priests and hazardous treasure hunts entertains from page one. Familial intrigue heightens the tension, as does a kidnapping or two. The cast of characters is dynamic and complements the well-conceived plot.

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Janet Lane Walters has been writing and published since the days of the typewriter. She has 30 plus novels and seven novellas plus four non-fiction books published. Janet lives in the scenic Hudson River valley with her husband, a psychiatrist who has no desire to cure her obsession with writing. She is the mother of four and the grandmother of five with two children expected to arrive soon from China. Janet writes in a number of genres - Romance from sweet to sensual and from contemporary to fantasy and paranormal. She has published cozy mysteries and medical suspense. She also has a number of YA fantasies published.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »A House Divided«

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A House Divided

BWL Publishing Inc.


Rebecca Lorenzo, the young widow of a Hollywood actor who was killed by a crazed fan, is struggling to raise their young daughter, Wendy. Rebecca is embittered that God allowed her precious husband to die. She has turned her back on Him. Rebecca and Wendy move from L.A. to Rebecca's hometown on the Oregon coast. Due to a miscommunication, Rebecca mistakenly believes she can buy a Victorian house there. She hopes to cocoon herself in the security of her "safe" hometown. Rebecca meets the handsome, enigmatic homeowner, Mark Simons, and learns of his plans to tear down the house. Mark, a psychiatrist, is attempting to raise money to build a halfway house on the property, and he is admittedly a workaholic. He believes this project is God's will for him. Mark refuses to budge when Rebecca approaches him about selling the house. As Rebecca and Mark struggle to battle their individual demons from the past, they also struggle to resist their growing love for each other.

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This story deals with bitterness and grief, but shows the reader that with God's help and true love you can overcome. I especially liked the biblical references to faith, and prayer. Great read!

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Through Feminist Eyes«

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Through Feminist Eyes

Athabasca University Press


Through Feminist Eyes gathers in one volume the most incisive and insightful essays written to date by the distinguished Canadian historian Joan Sangster. To the original essays, Sangster has added reflective introductory discussions that situate her earlier work in the context of developing theory and debate. Sangster has also supplied an introduction to the collection in which she reflects on the themes and theoretical orientations that have shaped the writing of women's history over the past thirty years.

Approaching her subject matter from an array of interpretive frameworks that engage questions of gender, class, colonialism, politics, and labour, Sangster explores the lived experience of women in a variety of specific historical settings. In so doing, she sheds new light on issues that have sparked much debate among feminist historians and offers a thoughtful overview of the evolution of women's history in Canada.

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“Sangster does an extraordinary job of situating her work within the literature of women's history and politics and engages with theoretical debates in feminist ideologies since its first emergence in academia. She goes beyond a historical examination of gender and women's history by interweaving her own experiences and challenges as a feminist academic conducting research in the field for over thirty years. This text is a vital contribution to the scholarship of Canadian women's history.”

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Joan Sangster is a professor of women's studies and history at Trent University, where she also teaches at the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Native Studies. Her most recent books are Girl Trouble: Female 'Delinquency' in English Canada and Transforming Labour: Women and Work in Postwar Canada.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Importance of Being Monogamous«

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The Importance of Being Monogamous

Athabasca University Press and University of Alberta Press | The West Unbound


Sarah Carter reveals the pioneering efforts of the government, legal, and religious authorities to impose the “one man, one woman”model of marriage upon Mormons and Aboriginal people in Western Canada. This lucidly written, richly researched book revises what we know about marriage and the gendered politics of late 19th century reform, shifts our understanding of Aboriginal history during that time, and brings together the fields of Indigenous and migrant history in new and important ways.

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“This innovative book brings together a wide range of subjects and sources to pursue a theme not previously articulated in a single work. Although the pressures increasingly placed on First Nations people, from the 1800s onward, to marry in conventional church ceremonies and to eschew polygamy have often been discussed, the extent to which other groups were pressed to conform to mainstream practices is little known…. Carter demonstrates that monogamy was not just an ‘Indian’ issue; Canadian authorities also challenged non-conforming minorities of European background. These groups, often small and dispersed, were less successful than established Aboriginal communities in subverting and resisting the pressures imposed on their modes of marriage and divorce.”

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"The importance of monogamy was not something readily evident to much of the varied population of 19th-century Western Canada, Edmonton author and University of Alberta historian Sarah Carter points out in her new study of marriage and nation building in the old West.

Carter's fourth book, which recently made the longlist for the prestigious Cundill International Prize in History, begins by reflecting on the currency of this subject during the seemingly interminable current debate on family values and same-sex marriage. Carter sees much of this debate rooted in "a wistful nostalgia for an imaginary simpler time, when gender roles were firmly in place with the husband as family head and provider, and the wife as the dependent partner -- obedient, unobtrusive, and submissive."

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Sarah Carter is professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair in both the Department of History and Classics and the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on the critical era that began in the late 19th century when Aboriginal people were dispossessed and a new population established in Western Canada.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Recovering the Body«

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Recovering the Body

University of Ottawa Press


Following the metaphysical and epistemological threads that have led to our modern conception of the body as a machine, the book explores views of the body in the history of philosophy. Its central thesis is that the Cartesian paradigm, which has dominated the modern conception of the body (including the development and practice of medicine), offers an incomplete and even inaccurate picture. This picture has become a reductio ad absurdum, which, through such current trends as the practice of extreme body modification, and futuristic visions of downloading consciousness into machines, could lead to the disappearance of the biological body. Presenting Spinoza’s philosophy of the body as the road not followed, the author asks what Spinoza would think of some of our contemporary body visions. It also looks to two more holistic approaches to the body that offer hope of recovering its true meaning: the practice of yoga and alternative medicine. The metaphysical analysis is accompanied throughout by a tripartite historical and epistemological analysis: the body as an obstacle to knowledge (exemplified by Plato and our modern-day futurists), the body as an object of knowledge (exemplified by Descartes and modern scientific medicine); and the body as a source of knowledge (exemplified by the Stoics, and the philosophy of yoga).

- This book is published in English. 

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land«

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An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land

Athabasca University Press


In 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the Algonquian communities—who hosted and tolerated the fur traders—and later, the missionaries, anthropologists, and others who found their way into Indigenous lives and territories. The eighteen essays gathered in this book explore Brown’s investigations into the surprising range of interactions among Indigenous people and newcomers as they met or observed one another from a distance, and as they competed, compromised, and rejected or adapted to change.

While diverse in their subject matter, the essays have thematic unity in their focus on the old HBC territory and its peoples from the 1600s to the present. More than an anthology, the chapters of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land provide examples of Brown’s exceptional skill in the close study of texts, including oral documents, images, artifacts, and other cultural expressions. The volume as a whole represents the scholarly evolution of one of the leading ethnohistorians in Canada and the United States.

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"A welcome and compelling selection of articles (some previously published, some unpublished) that focus on the stories of Cree, Ojibwe and Métis peoples, Hudson’s Bay and Northwest Company fur traders, Methodist and Anglican missionaries,and twentieth-century anthropologists. [...] The varied thematic foci of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land allow readers to delve into topics and issues related to language, family, marriage, women, and Indigenous stories and memories. Each chapter is of interest in its own right, but gathered here each becomes part of a larger narrative of a lifetime of scholarship and contributions by one of the most important practitioners in her field."

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"Brown's clear narrative writing style makes this collection accessible to both academic and public audiences. Historians will appreciate her close and thorough reading of primary sources. Anthropologists will recognize Brown's attention to language and her reading of the historical record through an ethnographic lens that can focus on both the micro-scales of domestic life and the macro-scales of the fur trade's political economy."

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"Brown's ability to read between the lines of texts of all kinds is without parallel in Canadian ethnohistory. The articles are a pleasure to read, full of insight and analysis, and written with the agreeable style of a born communicator and teacher. [...] Brown's work continues to impress and influence."

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Jennifer S. H. Brown taught history at the University of Winnipeg for twenty-eight years and held a Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal history from 2004 to 2011. She served as director of the Centre for Rupert’s Land Studies, which focuses on Aboriginal peoples and the fur trade of the Hudson Bay watershed, from 1996 to 2010. She is the editor of the Rupert’s Land Record Society documentary series (McGill-Queen’s University Press), which publishes original materials on Aboriginal and fur trade history. She now resides in Denver, Colorado, where she continues her scholarly work.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Say No without Feeling Guilty & still Negotiate Successfully«

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Say No without Feeling Guilty & still Negotiate Successfully

Best of HR – Berufebilder.de®


CLIMATE PROTECTION AND KNOWLEDGE: With this book you support - documented - afforestation projects and digital neural machine learning translation, receive compact information and checklists from experts (overview and press reviews in the book preview) as well as advice proven in practice, which leads step by step to success - also thanks to add-on. Because as the saying goes: Everybodies Darling, Everybodies Depp. Or also: If you want to please everybody, you put yourself in the wrong. Everybody knows that, but in important situations many people don't succeed in simply saying "no". Often, the fear of social devaluation or sanctions, false politeness, too high demands on oneself or feelings of guilt are behind it. It is precisely these negative feelings that can become problematic in a negotiation, especially when it is particularly important to assert one's own position as uncompromisingly as possible. This book helps here by pointing out causes and suggesting possible solutions.

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Our publishing house has a special concept: You will find all authors in the detailed table of contents paired with information as desired, free onDemand-eCourses as add-on, and many more offers. Our books on job, hr, management, finance and life support are praised by press and customers – more in the book. Editor Simone Janson is a German Top-20-Blogger, bestselling author and was a columnist for renowned media - more in Wikipedia. We support neural machine learning with our AI-translation.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Interrogating Motherhood«

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Interrogating Motherhood

Athabasca University Press | OPEL (Open Paths to Enriched Learning)


Four decades have passed since the publication of Adrienne Rich’s Of Woman Born but her analysis of maternity and the archetypal Mother remains a powerful critique, as relevant today as it was at the time of writing. It was Rich who first defined the term “motherhood” as referent to a patriarchal institution that was male-defined, male controlled, and oppressive to women. To empower women, Rich proposed the use of the word “mothering”: a word intended to be female-defined. It is between these two ideas—that of a patriarchal history and a feminist future—that the introductory text, Interrogating Motherhood, begins.

Ross explores the topic of mothering from the perspective of Western society and encourages students and readers to identify and critique the historical, social, and political contexts in which mothers are understood. By examining popular culture, employment, public policy, poverty, “other” mothers, and mental health, Interrogating Motherhood describes the fluid and shifting nature of the practice of mothering and the complex realities that definecontemporary women’s lives.

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“Ross provides a comprehensive take on the state of contemporary motherhood in the western world. The book examines the social, political, and economic conditions that influence the ways women - and, to a lesser degree, men - mother. She organizes the book around three themes: the dominant discourses on motherhood; the ways public factors shape private practices of mothering; and the negotiations contemporary women must make to mother. The book is clearly written and organized and gives readers an up-to-date accounting of contemporary motherhood.”

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Lynda R. Ross is professor of women’s and gender studies, and chair of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies at Athabasca University. She has a doctorate degree in psychology from the University of New Brunswick. Her research focuses on the social construction of theory and disorder, attachment, and motherhood.

 
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