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How Canadians Communicate III

Beaty, BartBriton, DerekFilax, GloriaSullivan, Rebecca (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press


What does Canadian popular culture say about the construction and negotiation of Canadian national identity? This third volume of How Canadians Communicate describes the negotiation of popular culture across terrains where national identity is built by producers and audiences, government and industry, history and geography, ethnicities and citizenships.Canada does indeed have a popular culture distinct from other nations. How Canadians Communicate III gathers the country’s most inquisitive experts on Canadian popular culture to prove its thesis.

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“The book is well-conceived and the articles offer compelling reading and dynamic viewpoints that would make for a fine addition to Canadian Studies and popular culture courses. [Beaty and Sullivan] effectively demonstrate that popular culture can be a means of communication on a broader scale when context is taken into consideration. By setting the stage for the reader in their discussions of how popular culture should be considered, they are able to subtly remind the reader that context matters just as much as content.”

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Bart Beaty is an associate professor in the Faculty of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. He has written and published extensively on cultural studies and issues in communication theory.

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Derek Briton is Associate Director of Athabasca University’s Centre for Integrated Studies. His research focuses on the psychoanalysis of society and culture, particularly the implications of Lacanian psychoanalysis for teaching and learning.

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Gloria Filax teaches and coordinates the Equality/Social Justice stream in the MAIS program at Athabasca University. Her research interests include gender/sexuality studies, processes of racialization, disability studies, and other forms of normalization.

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Rebecca Sullivan is an associate professor in the Faculty of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. She specializes in feminist film and media studies.

 
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YOLO (You Only Live Once)

Cooltura


A tour through all the keys to understanding the phenomenon that drives young people to live intensely. Carpe Diem, the term that was coined by ancient thinkers was recycled into a philosophy encapsulated within the Internet age. YOLO is on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and in the messages circulating on Whatsapp, non-stop, twenty-four hours a day.

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Mandatory reading for young people and their parents" [SOURCE: Alexandra Kirkpatrick]

"Young people spend more time online than offline; we must know everything that becomes a trend" [SOURCE: Parker Janet Shaw]

"An interesting analysis of what young people share every day on social networks" [SOURCE: Suzanne Borg]

 
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YOLO (Solo se vive una vez)

Cooltura


Un recorrido con todas las claves para entender el fenómeno que impulsa a los jóvenes a vivir con intensidad. "Carpe Diem", la expresión que nació con los pensadores de la antigüedad se recicló en una filosofía encapsulada en la era de Internet. YOLO está en Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest y en los mensajes que circulan por Whatsapp, sin freno, durante las veinticuatro horas del día.

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"Deberían leerlo los jóvenes y sus padres" [SOURCE: Alexandra Kirkpatrick]

"Los jóvenes pasan más tiempo conectados que fuera de las redes, debemos conocer todo lo que se convierte en tendencia" [SOURCE: Janet Parker Shaw]

"Un análisis interesante sobre lo que los jóvenes comparten día a día en las redes sociales" [SOURCE: Suzanne Borg]

 
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American Labour's Cold War Abroad

Athabasca University Press


During the Cold War, American labour organizations were at the centre of the battle for the hearts and minds of working people. At a time when trade unions were a substantial force in both American and European politics, the fiercely anti-communist American Federation of Labor–Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL–CIO), set a strong example for labour organizations overseas. The AFL–CIO cooperated closely with the US government on foreign policy and enjoyed an intimate, if sometimes strained, relationship with the CIA. The activities of its international staff, and especially the often secretive work of Jay Lovestone and Irving Brown—whose biographies read like characters plucked from a Le Carré novel—exerted a major influence on relationships in Europe and beyond.

Having mastered the enormous volume of correspondence and other records generated by staffers Lovestone and Brown, Carew presents a lively and clear account of what has largely been an unknown dimension of the Cold War. In impressive detail, Carew maps the international programs of the AFL–CIO during the Cold War and its relations with labour organizations abroad, in addition to providing a summary of the labour situation of a dozen or more countries including Finland, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, Greece, and India. American Labour’s Cold War Abroad reveals how the Cold War compelled trade unionists to reflect on the role of unions in a free society. Yet there was to be no meeting of minds on this, and at the end of the 1960s the AFL–CIO broke with the mainstream of the international labour movement to pursue its own crusade against communism.

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"Carew's intervention adds greatly to what we know and, in a number of ways, re-establishes the groundowrk from which future works on this subject must build."

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Anthony Carew is a lifelong trade unionist and is currently an honorary visiting reader in international labour studies in the Alliance Manchester Business School at the University of Manchester. Carew began work in the Canadian labour movement where became research director of the largest railway brotherhood. Later, he was a research fellow at the University of Sussex Centre for Contemporary European Studies focusing on European trade unionism, and for twenty-six years he taught industrial relations and labour history at the University of Manchester Institute for Science and Technology. Widely published, his books include Labour Under the Marshall Plan, The Lower Deck of the Royal Navy 1900-1939 and The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, (with co-authors Dreyfus, Van Goethem, Gumbrell-McCormick, and van der Linden).

 
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Secret Life

Goose Lane Editions


It began as rumours. Whispers at dinner parties. Warnings about bad dates with a Canadian celebrity. Then, seemingly out of nowhere, superstar CBC broadcaster Jian Ghomeshi revealed his interest in "rough sex" in a long Facebook post, and a scandal of unprecedented scale descended on the radio host.

What the public did not know was that months before Ghomeshi's emotional post, Canadaland podcaster Jesse Brown and Toronto Star journalist Kevin Donovan were quietly pursuing serious allegations against him. In Secret Life, Donovan takes us inside the Star's investigation. Step by step, he explores the story as only he can: the media frenzy, his own personal and professional doubts, the women who came forward with stories about an alleged dark side of a national idol, and Ghomeshi's ignominious firing and dramatic criminal trial. Taking us behind the scenes, Donovan sheds light on the journalistic process and the complexity of gathering information about a highly sensitive matter from named and confidential sources, including those women who feared it was their word against a beloved public figure's.

Secret Life is a thought-provoking account of the landmark Ghomeshi exposé; that sparked a nation-wide discussion on sexual assault, the cult of celebrity, and the politics of power and gender in the workplace.

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"Donovan has produced a page-turner."

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"A high point in the history of modern Canadian journalism."

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Kevin Donovan is an investigative reporter and editor at the Toronto Star. A thirty-year veteran of the paper, he has won two Governor General's Awards (Michener) for public service journalism, three National Newspaper Awards, and three Canadian Association of Journalists Awards. He is also the author of ORNGE: The Star Investigation that Broke the Story.

Donovan is a trusted and experienced investigative journalist who has grown both journalistically and personally through the writing of this book. In this book, he is, in some ways, the everyman, who grows in his understanding of the complexities of discussing sexual assault.

 
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The Digital Nexus

Foshay, Raphael (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | Cultural Dialectics


Over half a century ago, in The Gutenberg Galaxy (1962), Marshall McLuhan noted that the overlap of traditional print and new electronic media like radio and television produced widespread upheaval in personal and public life:

Even without collision, such co-existence of technologies and awareness brings trauma and tension to every living person. Our most ordinary and conventional attitudes seem suddenly twisted into gargoyles and grotesques. Familiar institutions and associations seem at times menacing and malignant. These multiple transformations, which are the normal consequence of introducing new media into any society whatever, need special study.

The trauma and tension in the daily lives of citizens as described here by McLuhan was only intensified by the arrival of digital media and the Web in the following decades. The rapidly evolving digital realm held a powerful promise for creative and constructive good—a promise so alluring that much of the inquiry into this new environment focused on its potential rather than its profound impact on every sphere of civic, commercial, and private life. The totalizing scope of the combined effects of computerization and the worldwide network are the subject of the essays in The Digital Nexus, a volume that responds to McLuhan’s request for a “special study” of the tsunami-like transformation of the communication landscape.

These critical excursions provide analysis of and insight into the way new media technologies change the workings of social engagement for personal expression, social interaction, and political engagement. The contributors investigate the terms and conditions under which our digital society is unfolding and provide compelling arguments for the need to develop an accurate grasp of the architecture of the Web and the challenges that ubiquitous connectivity undoubtedly delivers to both public and private life.

With contributions by Ian Angus, Maria Bakardjieva, Daryl Campbell, Sharone Daniel, Andrew Feenberg, Raphael Foshay, Carolyn Guertin, David J. Gunkel, Bob Hanke, Leslie Lindballe, Mark McCutcheon, Roman Onufrijchuk, Josipa G. Petrunić, Peter J. Smith, Lorna Stefanick, and Karen Wall.

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“The Digital Nexus belongs to a new wave of scholarship inquiring into the many challenges and disruptions that networked communication imposes on public and private affairs. It looks at tech-driven transformation through the triple lenses of identity, agency (our ability to participate in society and take action) and political engagement—with a special focus on democratic processes and social action.[...]If we want technology that supports democracy, open dialogue and humanist values, then we will need to shape it accordingly. But there are other agendas at work and the struggle to determine the Internet's future has only just begun. For this reason, we've never needed books like The Digital Nexus more.”

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Raphael Foshay has been teaching in Athabasca University’s MA Program in Integrated Studies, since 2008. His interests lie principally in literary, cultural, and interdisciplinary theory. He has written on Derrida, Hegel, Heidegger, and Levinas, as well as such literary figures as Joyce, Yeats, Kafka, and Wyndham Lewis and is the editor of Valences of Interdisciplinarity: Theory, Practice, Pedagogy.

 
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How Canadians Communicate V

Taras, DavidWaddell, Christopher (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press


Fewer Canadians than ever are lacing up skates, swimming lengths at the pool, practicing their curve ball, and experiencing the thrill of competition. However, despite a decline in active participation, Canadians spend enormous amounts of time and money on sports, as fans and followers of sporting events and sports culture. Never has media coverage of sports been more exhaustive, and never has it been more driven by commercial interests and the need to fuel consumerism, on which corporate profits depend. But the power plays now occurring in the arena of sports are by no means solely a matter of money. At issue as well in the media capture of sports are the values that inform our daily lives, the physical and emotional health of the population, and the symbols so long central to a sense of Canadian identity.

Writing from a variety of perspectives, the contributors to this collection set out to explore the impact of the media on our reception of, and attitudes toward, sports—to unpack the meanings that sports have for us as citizens and consumers. Some contributors probe the function of sports as spectacle—the escalation of violence, controversies over drug use, and the media’s coverage of tragic deaths—while others shed light on the way in which the media serve to transform sports into a vehicle for the expression of identity and nationalism. The goal is not to score points but to prompt critical discussion of why sports matter in Canadian life and culture and how they contribute to the construction of identity.

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David Taras holds the Ralph Klein Chair in media studies at Mount Royal University. He served as an expert advisor to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage and is the co-author of The Last Word: Media Coverage of the Supreme Court of Canada.

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Christopher Waddell is associate professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University, where he holds the Carty Chair in business and financial journalism. He was formerly national editor for The Globe and Mail and Parliamentary bureau chief for CBC television news.

 
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Speaking Power to Truth

Keren, MichaelHawkins, Richard (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | Cultural Dialectics


Online discourse has created a new media environment for contributions to public life, one that challenges the social significance of the role of public intellectuals—intellectuals who, whether by choice or by circumstance, offer commentary on issues of the day. The value of such commentary is rooted in the assumption that, by virtue of their training and experience, intellectuals possess knowledge—that they understand what constitutes knowledge with respect to a particular topic, are able to distinguish it from mere opinion, and are in a position to define its relevance in different contexts. When intellectuals comment on matters of public concern, they are accordingly presumed to speak truth, whether they are writing books or op-ed columns or appearing as guests on radio and television news programs. At the same time, with increasing frequency, discourse on public life is taking place online. This new digital environment is characterized by abundance—an abundance of speakers, discussion, and access. But has this abundance of discourse—this democratization of knowledge, as some describe it—brought with it a corresponding increase in truth?

Casting doubt on the assertion that online discourse, with its proliferation of voices, will somehow yield collective wisdom, Speaking Power to Truth raises concerns that this wealth of digitally enabled commentary is, in fact, too often bereft of the hallmarks of intellectual discourse: an epistemological framework and the provision of evidence to substantiate claims. Instead, the pursuit of truth finds itself in competition with the quest for public reputation, access to influence, and enhanced visibility. But as knowledge is drawn into the orbit of power, and as the line between knowledge and opinion is blurred, what role will the public intellectual play in the promotion and nurturing of democratic processes and goals? In exploring the implications of the digital transition, the contributors to Speaking Power to Truth provide both empirical evidence of, and philosophical reflection on, the current and future role of the public intellectual in a technologically mediated public sphere.

With contributions by Karim-Aly Kassam, Barrry Cooper, Jacob G. Foster, Richard Hawkins, Michael Keren, Boaz Miller, Liz Pirnie, and Eleanor Townsley.

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Michael Keren is a professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Political Science and the Department of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. He is the author of many books on public intellectuals, political communication, and political literature, including Blogosphere: The New Political Arena and The Citizen’s Voice: Twentieth-Century Politics and Literature.

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Richard Hawkins is professor in the Science, Technology and Society Program at the University of Calgary, senior fellow at the Centre for Innovation Studies (THECIS), and a fellow of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy at the University of Ottawa. He has served as policy consultant for such clients as the World Bank and Industry Canada and has authored more than a hundred scientific publications and technical reports on science, technology, and industry policy.

 
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Film and the City

Athabasca University Press


Most Canadians are city dwellers, a fact often unacknowledged by twentieth-century Canadian films, with their preference for themes of wilderness survival or rural life. Modernist Canadian films tend to support what film scholar Jim Leach calls “the nationalist-realist project,” a documentary style that emphasizes the exoticism and mythos of the land. Over the past several decades, however, the hegemony of Anglo-centrism has been challenged by francophone and First Nations perspectives and the character of cities altered by a continued influx of immigrants and the development of cities as economic and technological centers. No longer primarily defined through the lens of rural nostalgia, Canadian urban identity is instead polyphonic, diverse, constructed through multiple discourses and mediums, an exchange rather than a strict orientation. Taking on the urban as setting and subject, filmmakers are ideally poised to create and reflect multiple versions of a single city.

Examining fourteen Canadian films produced from 1989 to 2007, including Denys Arcand’s Jésus de Montréal (1989), Jean-Claude Lauzon’s Léolo (1992), Mina Shum’s Double Happiness (1994), Clément Virgo’s Rude (1995), and Guy Maddin’s My Winnipeg (2007), Film and the City is the first comprehensive study of Canadian film and “urbanity”—the totality of urban culture and life. Drawing on film and urban studies and building upon issues of identity formation in Canadian studies, Melnyk considers how filmmakers, films, and urban audiences experience, represent, and interpret urban spatiality, visuality, and orality. In this way, Film and the City argues that Canadian narrative film of the postmodern period has aided in articulating a new national identity.

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George Melnyk is associate professor in the Department of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. He has published a number of books on Canadian cinema, including One Hundred Years of Canadian Cinema (2004), Great Canadian Film Directors (2007), The Young, the Restless, and the Dead: Interviews with Canadian Filmmakers (2008), and The Gendered Screen: Canadian Women Filmmakers (2010).

 
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Les littératures franco-canadiennes à l’épreuve du temps

Hotte, LucieParé, François (Hrsg.) | Les Presses de l'Université d'Ottawa | Archives des lettres canadiennes


Finaliste, Prix du Canada 2018, Fédération des sciences humaines

« Les littératures de l’exiguïté, dont font partie les ensembles littéraires franco-canadiens, restent fascinées par les sémantiques de l’espace. Elles en oublient leur longue histoire et renoncent, par là, aux riches taxonomies liées au passé collectif et à la mémoire, tant elles s’entêtent à coïncider avec les territoires imaginés, géographiques et identitaires, où elles s’inscrivent. »

Lucie Hotte et François Paré ont réuni des études qui témoignent du dynamisme de l’activité littéraire franco-canadienne marquée par l’histoire, mais aussi représentative de l’image que chacune des collectivités se fait d’elle-même et de son avenir. Les œuvres analysées illustrent la recherche esthétique d’une grande originalité, menée par les écrivains franco-canadiens dans des conditions souvent difficiles sur le plan des institutions littéraires et des moyens de publication ou de diffusion.

Cet ouvrage réunit les textes de Marie Carrière, Jeanette den Toonder, Grégoire Holtz, Lucie Hotte, Kathleen Kellett, Louise Ladouceur, Jean Morency, François Paré, Pamela V. Sing, Jimmy Thibeault et Emmanuelle Tremblay. En somme, une multiplicité de regards et une synthèse unique sur la francophonie canadienne durant plus de quatre siècles d’écriture.

Une coédition avec le Centre de recherche en civilisation canadienne-française.

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Sous les auspices de François Paré et de Lucie Hotte, deux sommités

dans le domaine, le collectif Les littératures franco-canadiennes à l’épreuve du

temps réunit onze études de la plume de chercheurs évoluant un peu partout

au Canada ainsi que d’une chercheure venant des Pays-Bas. (...) À la suite d’une introduction typique des collectifs universitaires,

la section «Textes et contextes» offre des articles exceptionnels sur des

sujets dont il n’a jamais vraiment été question auparavant. Il s'agit d'un collectif d’une grande qualité qui participe aux nouvelles solidarités franco-canadiennes.

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[Ce livre] propose de nombreuses pistes de réflexion en

présentant la diversité et la richesse des auteurs et des œuvres du Canada

français.

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Lucie Hotte est professeure titulaire au Département de français et titulaire de la Chaire de recherche sur les cultures et les littératures francophones du Canada. Elle travaille actuellement à un projet de recherche subventionné par le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines (CRSH, 2015-2020) portant sur les réseaux littéraires franco-canadiens. Lucie Hotte est également vice-présidente élue du Conseil international d’études francophones depuis juin 2015.

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François Paré, MSRC, est professeur titulaire au Département d’études françaises de l’Université de Waterloo. En 1993, Les littératures de l’exiguïté lui a valu le Prix du Gouverneur général du Canada. Il est aussi l’auteur de Théories de la fragilité (Les Éditions du Nordir, 1994), puis, avec François Ouellet, de Traversées (Les Éditions du Nordir, 2000 ; Éditions Nota bene, 2014). Son ouvrage, La distance habitée (Les Éditions du Nordir, 2003) lui a valu le prix Trillium et le prix Victor-Barbeau. Il a aussi fait paraître Le fantasme d’Escanaba (Nota bene, 2008) et, toujours avec François Ouellet, un essai sur Louis Hamelin (Nota bene, 2008), et Diasporiques (codir. Tara Collington, Éditions David, 2013).

 
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