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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Petun to Wyandot«

Petun to Wyandot

Canadian Museum of History | Mercury Series


In Petun to Wyandot, Charles Garrad draws upon five decades of research to tell the turbulent history of the Wyandot tribe, the First Nation once known as the Petun. Combining and reconciling primary historical sources, archaeological data and anthropological evidence, Garrad has produced the most comprehensive study of the Petun Confederacy. Beginning with their first encounters with French explorer Samuel de Champlain in 1616 and extending to their decline and eventual dispersal, this book offers an account of this people from their own perspective and through the voices of the nations, tribes and individuals that surrounded them.

Through a cross-reference of views, including historical testimony from Jesuits, European explorers and fur traders, as well as neighbouring tribes and nations, Petun to Wyandot uncovers the Petun way of life by examining their culture, politics, trading arrangements and legends. Perhaps most valuable of all, it provides detailed archaeological evidence from the years of research undertaken by Garrad and his colleagues in the Petun Country, located in the Blue Mountains of Central Ontario. Along the way, the author meticulously chronicles the work of other historians and examines their theories regarding the Petun's enigmatic life story.

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“It’s been a long long journey to bring this book into being, said Garrad joking that archaeological talks and archaeological books are exceedingly boring before launching into a story that began in France in the mid-1500s. It was Champlain who found a series of well-built villages belonging to an agricultural and trading people in 1616 .He named them Nation de Petun Tobacco Nation a people who had broken away from the Huron Nation and moved into the area around Craigleith to participate in the fur trade.”

– Sun Times, 2014, p. A03

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"What he has achieved is really very extraordinary," he said. "He has published and written extensively on the Petun...This 628-page book is a distillation of that. It is a lifetime of work. It is his attempt to put what is between his two ears into a book. In archaeology it is rare for people to do that."

– Erika Engel, Blue Mountains Courier Herald, 2014

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Charles Garrad’s dedication to understanding the Petun began in the late 1950s when he was shown an archaeological site near Craigleith, in Ontario’s Blue Mountains. As the study of the Petun became his life project, Garrad came to be recognized as an authority on the subject. Over the years, he undertook countless excavations and published widely on the matter.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Alberta's Lower Athabasca Basin«

Alberta's Lower Athabasca Basin

Ronaghan, Brian M. (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | Recovering the Past


Over the past two decades, the oil sands region of northeastern Alberta has been the site of unprecedented levels of development. Alberta's Lower Athabasca Basin tells a fascinating story of how a catastrophic ice age flood left behind a unique landscape in the Lower Athabasca Basin, one that made deposits of bitumen available for surface mining. Less well known is the discovery that this flood also produced an environment that supported perhaps the most intensive use of boreal forest resources by prehistoric Native people yet recognized in Canada. Studies undertaken to meet the conservation requirements of the Alberta Historical Resources Act have yielded a rich and varied record of prehistoric habitation and activity in the oil sands area. Evidence from between 9,500 and 5,000 years ago—the result of several major excavations—has confirmed extensive human use of the region’s resources, while important contextual information provided by key geological and palaeoenvironmental studies has deepened our understanding of how the region’s early inhabitants interacted with the landscape.

Touching on various elements of this rich environmental and archaeological record, the contributors to this volume use the evidence gained through research and compliance studies to offer new insights into human and natural history. They also examine the challenges of managing this irreplaceable heritage resource in the face of ongoing development.

Contributors: Alwynne Beaudoin, Angela Younie, Brian O.K. Reeves, Duane Froese, Elizabeth Roberston, Eugene Gryba, Gloria Fedirchuk, Grant Clarke, John W. Ives, Janet Blakey, Jennifer Tischer, Jim Burns, Laura Roskowski, Luc Bouchet, Murray Lobb, Nancy Saxberg, Raymond LeBlanc, Robert R. Young, Robin Woywitka, Thomas V. Lowell, and Timothy Fisher

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"Numerous scholars authored more than a dozen intensely focused papers, but the volume's introduction and organization—as well as limited but effective repetition of parts of the overall narrative in individual papers ensure that a cogent story emerges out of a wide-ranging discussion of events spanning 10,000 years. [...] An example of the excellent topical publishing tradition apparent in Canadian universities. This volume may appeal to an overwhelmingly academic audience that is mostly resident in North America, but it will certainly do so for decades to come."

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For more than twenty years Brian Ronaghan served in a research and regulatory compliance role with the Government of Alberta and oversaw archaeological studies in Alberta.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Archäologie als Naturwissenschaft?«

Archäologie als Naturwissenschaft?

Vergangenheitsverlag


Seit rund zwei Jahrzehnten ist eine deutliche Zunahme der Zusammenarbeit einiger archäologischer Fächer mit den Naturwissenschaften festzustellen. Dazu gehört besonders die Ur- und Frühgeschichtliche Archäologie, die in dieser Streitschrift im Zentrum steht. An die Stelle des Spatens, bis vor wenigen Jahren noch traditionelles Symbol der Archäologie, sind längst moderne technische Geräte wie das Notebook getreten. Und bei der Auswertung und Deutung von Funden und Fundkontexten scheinen naturwissenschaftliche Methoden mittlerweile den ‚Königsweg‘ zu weisen. Die Ur- und Frühgeschichtliche Archäologie, so die Kernthese der Autoren, gerate immer stärker in den Bann eines positivistisch-szientistischen Paradigmas. Gleichzeitig sind in sehr seriösen und traditionsreichen deutschen Fachzeitschriften beunruhigende Tendenzen pseudoreligiöser und esoterischer Deutungen urgeschichtlicher Phänomene zu beobachten. Solche auch über Ausstellungen, populärwissenschaftliche Literatur und Medien verbreitete Thesen finden einen starken Widerhall in der Öffentlichkeit. Sie sind damit das Gegenteil verantwortungsbewusster Popularisierung von Wissenschaft. Insgesamt, so das Fazit dieses Pamphlets, befindet sich die Ur- und Frühgeschichtliche Archäologie auf einem Weg, der nicht mit ihrem Selbstverständnis als vergleichend orientierte Historische Kulturwissenschaft zu vereinbaren ist.

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Stefanie Samida (geb. 1973) ist Archäologin und Medienwissenschaftlerin und forscht derzeit am Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung Potsdam.

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Manfred Eggert (geb. 1941) war zuletzt Professor für Ur- und Frühgeschichte an der Eberhard-Karls-Universität Manfred Eggert (geb. 1941) war zuletzt Professor für Ur- und Frühgeschichte an der Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Imagining Head Smashed In«

Imagining Head Smashed In

Athabasca University Press


At the place known as Head-Smashed-In in southwestern Alberta, Aboriginal people practiced a form of group hunting for nearly 6,000 years before European contact. The large communal bison traps of the Plains were the single greatest food-getting method ever developed in human history. Hunters, working with their knowledge of the land and of buffalo behaviour, drove their quarry over a cliff and into wooden corrals. The rest of the group butchered the kill in the camp below. Author Jack Brink, who devoted 25 years of his career to “The Jump,” has chronicled the cunning, danger, and triumph in the mass buffalo hunts and the culture they supported. He also recounts the excavation of the site and the development of the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump Interpretive Centre, which has hosted 2 million visitors since it opened in 1987. Brink’s masterful blend of scholarship and public appeal is rare in any discipline, but especially in North American pre-contact archaeology.

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"Imaging Head-Smashed-In: Aboriginal Buffalo Hunting on the Northern Plains is an outstanding book with a unique tale to tell. Brink uses the past and eyewitness accounts described by early settlers to set the mood for his story, which includes an abundant source of ancient legends from the Elders and a host of buffalo jump stories by those who wrote down what they witnessed on the plains of southern Alberta and beyond."---Alberta Native News

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Jack W. Brink is Archaeology Curator at the Royal Alberta Museum in Edmonton, Canada. He received his B.A. from the University of Minnesota and his M.A. from the University of Alberta. His interests also include the study of rock art images of the northern Plains, and he enjoys working with Aboriginal communities on heritage issues.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Light from Ancient Campfires«

Light from Ancient Campfires

Athabasca University Press


Light from Ancient Campfires is the first book in twenty years to gather together a comprehensive prehistoric archaeological record of the Northern Plains First Nations. In this important examination of the region’s earliest inhabitants, author Trevor R. Peck reviews the many changes of interpretation that have occurred in relevant literature published during the last two decades. Beginning with the earliest archaeological evidence for people in Alberta, Light from Ancient Campfires covers each period in chronological sequence. Throughout his research, Peck asks the following questions: What defines the cultural entity? How has our notion of it changed with increased information? What is the current state of thought concerning this issue? Light from Ancient Campfires provides a new definition for each archaeological phase, setting previous literature in a new light.

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Trevor R. Peck is the plains archaeologist at the Archaeological Survey with the Alberta government. He received his MA from the University of Alberta and his PhD from the University of Calgary. The author of numerous articles and monographs, Dr. Peck’s research interests include the prehistory of the Northern Plains, public archaeology, and archaeological theory.

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