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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Gefühlte Wahrheiten«

Gefühlte Wahrheiten

Verlag Barbara Budrich


Populistische Strömungen gewinnen weltweit an Resonanz, gleichzeitig beobachten wir ein tiefes Misstrauen in die Problemlösungsfähigkeit der Politik, in die Fairness der Wirtschaft und die Unabhängigkeit der Wissenschaft. Der Soziologe und Risikoforscher Ortwin Renn führt diese Tendenzen auf gesellschaftliche Verunsicherung angesichts gesellschaftlicher Veränderung und Komplexität zurück. In seinem Buch untersucht er die aktuellen gesellschaftlichen Ängste, ihre Ursachen und Folgen. Aufklärend zielt Renn darauf, Verunsicherung abzubauen. Zudem will Renn mit diesem Buch mehr Zuversichtin die Leistungskraft der zentralen gesellschaftlichen Institutionen, aber auch mehr Zutrauen in die eigene Gestaltungskraftwecken.

Das Buch beschäftigt sich mit den Ängsten in unserer Gesellschaft, ihrer Wahrnehmung, ihren Gründen und ihrer Wirkung. Was ängstigt die Menschen derzeit genau? Was bedroht uns? Woher kommen diese Ängste? Wie können wir – individuell und kollektiv – besser damit umgehen? Und was macht es mit unserer Gesellschaft, wenn die Angst zu mächtig wird?

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »ABC's of Human Survival«

ABC's of Human Survival

Athabasca University Press | Global Peace Studies


The ABCs of Human Survival examines the effect of militant nationalism and the lawlessness of powerful states on the well-being of individuals and local communities?and the essential role of global citizenship within that dynamic. Based on the analysis of world events, Dr. Arthur Clark presents militant nationalism as a pathological pattern of thinking that threatens our security, while emphasizing effective democracy and international law as indispensable frameworks for human protection.Within the contexts of history, sociology, philosophy, and spirituality, The ABCs of Human Survival calls into question the assumptions of consumer culture and offers, as an alternative, strategies to improve overall well-being through the important choices we make as individuals.

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Dr. Arthur Clark is a Professor of Neuropathology and Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Calgary, and an active staff neuropathologist at the Foothills Hospital in Calgary. He carries lifelong experience with militant nationalist culture, having come of age during the Vietnam War and serving two years as Captain in the United States Army Medical Corps. In 1995, in honour of his late wife, he established the Dr. Irma M. Parhad Programmes at the University of Calgary, which focus on ways to improve worldwide health and well-being within the framework of international law. He is also currently involved in a project to establish a Calgary Centre for Global Community, to be based on the values and vision that informed The ABCs of Human Survival.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »What We Talk About When We Talk About War«

What We Talk About When We Talk About War

Goose Lane Editions


An Amazon.ca Editor's Pick for 2012 and a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book of 2012

Shortlisted, Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction, Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, and John W. Dafoe Book Prize

Longlisted, Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

A provocative examination of how communications has shaped the language of the media, and vice versa, and how rhetoric shapes how Canadians thinks of themselves as a nation and Canada's engagement in peacekeeping, war, and on the international stage.

According to Richler, each phase of engagement in Afghanistan has been shaped not only by rhetoric but an overarching narrative structure. This topic is very much in discussion at the moment. With the withdrawal of Canadian troops (at least in part) from Afghanistan, it becomes clear there had been a rhetorical cycle. Where once Canada wielded the myth of itself as a peacekeeping nation, the past decade has seen a marked shift away from this, emphasizing the Canadian soldier as warrior. Yet now, as the country withdraws, the oratorical language we use steps away from heroes, able warriors, and sacrifice and back towards a more comfortable vision of Canada in a peacekeeping/training role.

In recent years, Canada has made large financial investments in the apparatus of war — in a manner it hasn't in a very long time — and as the realities of war are brought home (the losses, the tragedies, the atrocities, the lasting repercussions that come home with the soldiers who were on the front lines), Richler contends that it's crucial we understand our national perspective on war — how we have framed it, how we continue to frame it.

Using recent events to bolster his arguments, including the shooting of American congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and the earthquake in Haiti, Richler argues that very possibly the epic narrative of Canada is winding back down to that of the novel as we slowly regain our peacekeeping agenda.

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"The book offers considerable meat to chew. ... I can't agree with all of Richler's analysis, but I am grateful he has raised some important issues that have not been, but should have been, fully debated in Parliament and in the rest of the country this past decade."

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"The eloquent writing studded with unusual, but 'stressing' words makes this book a page-turner for those who believe that peace leads to advancement of civilization and prosperity. ... This is an invaluable and erudite book that should be in every public and private library."

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"Richler must have anticipated polarizing his readers ... One can't agree with everything in it, but with its challenging ideas and provocative theme, it's worth the effort. If this book does not fire a debate, then it will be because we are not up for it."

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"Anyone looking for an argument about something important would be well served to pick up What We Talk About When We Talk About War, Richler's provocative and ambitious new book."

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"A hard-hitting polemic aimed at the new 'philistines' laying siege to Lester B. Pearson's legacy of liberal internationalism and peacekeeping ... Richler's War catapults him to the front line of the ongoing Canadian culture war. He brings to the task the unique talents and perceptions of a novelist. It's rare to find in Canadian political discourse precise references to Homer's The Iliad and the Trojan War."

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"An epic tale in the style of Greek mythology ... I'm glad to have read it. It won't likely resurrect Pearsonian peacekeeping, but it may help us imagine an alternative more suited to the 21st century."

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"Richler's description and analysis of how and by whom such an epic story has been promulgated in Canada is nothing short of masterful. ... It must be said that this is an important contribution to the ongoing struggles of peace and violence within the hearts of individuals and the political ethos of a nation."

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"Definitely a book that will get people talking and turn a few heads, I couldn't recommend it more."

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"Richler argues that the Canadian public has not been all that supportive or interested in the war in Afghanistan. He offers proof in the huge outpouring of sympathy and aid to Haiti. ... a great book for the peace movement to use. ... What We Talk About When We Talk About War lays the ground for what we must be talking about when we talk about peace."

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"Richler wants to make us think and then talk about what we've learned. There is a wealth of information here that is designed to wake us up to the dangers of accepting war as a part of the Canadian psyche just because the government says it is so. ... He wants us to realize it is too easy to create a false image of the glory of war which leads to acceptance of its inevitability and appropriateness. ... This book is not just criticism, it finishes with some realistic and positive suggestions for establishing an effective peace. It would be a worthwhile read for any concerned Canadian."

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"It is heartening, then, to find a book such as Noah Richler's that connects the dots between government policies, media attitudes and public ceremonies, and asks several uncomfortable questions about whether our country has permanently abandoned its previous stance in the world as peacekeeper for the more aggressive status of a 'warrior nation,' and if so, what the consequences will be for our civil liberties and freedom of expression."

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"It's a rare accomplishment to write a book in which even people on the author's side can find something to quibble with on every second page. That outcome, however, is not only inherent in what Richler wrote, but is the chief achievement of this densely textured work. For his argument is as literary as it is political: it's about words. ... As Richler points out, Canadians want an idealistic motive (building schools for girls, say) for war. The result is incoherence about our presence in Afghanistan, and much of the nation simply turning its face away. Six years after the Prime Minister famously promised never to 'cut and run' there, we are about to do precisely that. Time, Richler says, to talk about it honestly."

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"A scathing attack that won't sit well with veterans ... [Richler] urges readers to cut through the 'epic' talk that surrounds war and see it as it truly is: hell."

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"What We Talk About When We Talk About War is an eloquent meditation on the nature of modern warfare, and one of the best books I've read about Canada in years — not the surprisingly colourful, forgotten history of, but a biting analysis of who we are in the twenty-first century. and why. ... So we are living in epic times. By identifying a sea change in the Canadian political psyche, Noah Richler identifies the spirit of our times, opens an important discussion. ... Don't leave this one to the critics. Buy the book, sink back, get mad and enjoy."

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"Richler assembles his evidence from a dizzying array of sources ... [His] opponents should welcome this new, sharply framed chance to make their case over and against his passionate polemic, about what Canada — which has both fought wars and kept the peace — has been, is now, and ought to be in the future."

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"Provocative and well-researched ... [Richler] has raised some important issues that have not been, and should have been, fully debated in Parliament and in the rest of the country this past decade."

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"It may be a polemic, but Richler's book is a decidedly literate one ... Richler's argument is backed by a mind-boggling amount of literary references. Using everything from ancient myths to modern literature about war, the author shows how storytelling shapes a nation's identity."

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"In this thought-provoking and erudite work, Richler explores what he sees as a fundamental shift in Canadian politics, discource and identity ... [Richler] reveals that in the aftermath of Afghanistan, Canadians may once more need to rethink who we are and what we believe."

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"Richler's points are thought-provoking and perceptive ... well worth considering."

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"There is a wealth of information here that is designed to wake us up to the dangers of accepting war as a part of the Canadian psyche just because the government says it is so ... Richler's eloquent review of the history of a nation forged in trade, treaty, compromise and peace refutes this presumption."

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"Noah Richler has raised serious questions about how Canada's elites, including major newspaper columnists, have embraced a more warlike national identity, less peacekeeping, and a more aggressive Canadian military."

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"A book worthy of joining some of the greatest examinations of human behaviour."

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"Richler's important and very readable book deserves high praise for showing us in detail how language is constantly misused by this government and its supporters. And Richler may well have enabled us to see, for once ahead of time, how a legitimate love of country can easily be distorted for narrower, partisan ends."

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One of Canada's public intellectuals, Noah Richler was a prize-winning producer and host of documentaries and features at BBC Radio before he returned to Canada in 1998 to join the founding staff of the National Post as its first books editor and later as a literary columnist. He has written for CBC Radio's Ideas, for the Op-Ed and cultural pages of the Globe & Mail, the Toronto Star, and the National Post, and for the Walrus, MacLean's, and EnRoute, for which he has won several national magazine awards. He is the author of This Is My Country, What's Yours? A Literary Atlas of Canada, finalist for the 2006 Nereus Writer's Trust Non-Fiction Prize and winner of the 2007 British Columbia Award for Canadian Non-Fiction. He lives in Toronto and in Digby, Nova Scotia.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Too Dumb for Democracy?«

Too Dumb for Democracy?

Goose Lane Editions


Bad decisions down to a science.

D'oh-mocracy at its finest.

Brexit. Trump. Ford Nation. In this timely book, David Moscrop asks why we make irrational political decisions and whether our stone-age brains can process democracy in the information age.

In an era overshadowed by income inequality, environmental catastrophes, terrorism at home and abroad, and the decline of democracy, Moscrop argues that the political decision-making process has never been more important. In fact, our survival may depend on it.

Drawing on both political science and psychology, Moscrop examines how our brains, our environment, the media, and institutions influence decision-making. Making good decisions is not impossible, Moscrop argues, but the psychological and political odds are sometimes stacked against us. In this readable and provocative investigation of our often-flawed decisions, Moscrop explains what's going wrong in today's political landscape and how individuals, societies, and institutions can work together to set things right.

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"So much of modern political debate revolves around what people are feeling. It's nice to be reminded that deciding is the basic building block of democracy — not just for politicians, but for citizens too. If you've been worried lately about the state of democracy, Moscrop might just be able to help."

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"Moscrop is one of those most marvelous and rare things, a brilliant scholar who can synthesize history, politics, and science and explain them in a way that doesn't make the reader feel like they're being forced to do homework. You'll have a much better understanding of what's going on around you, and how to be part of the solution to the big issues facing all of us today."

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"It is difficult, in the Age of Trump, not to lose faith in democracy. Moscrop, to his credit, does not avert his eyes from the magnitude of the problems that confront us. More important, however, is that he provides some serious suggestions as to where the solutions might lie."

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David Moscrop is a political theorist with an interest in democratic deliberation and citizenship. Moscrop is a regular writer for Maclean’s, a contributing columnist to the Washington Post, and a regular political commentator on television and radio. He has also authored pieces in numerous other newspapers and magazines including the Globe and Mail and National Post.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Le Fédéralisme«

Le Fédéralisme

Les Presses de l'Université d'Ottawa


Les fédérations abritent quarante pour cent de la population mondiale. Les 28 pays dotés d’un régime politique fédéral se révèlent des plus diversifiés : de la nation la plus nantie du monde – les États-Unis d’Amérique – à de minuscules États insulaires comme la Micronésie et Saint-Kitts-et-Nevis. Six des dix pays les plus populeux et huit des dix pays les plus vastes de la planète sont des fédérations.

Ce livre d’une remarquable concision présente les notions élémentaires de ce système politique dans une langue claire et dépourvue de jargon—sans doute la raison pour laquelle il a été traduit en environ 20 langues. Il s’agit d’un ouvrage incontournable non seulement pour ceux qui étudient les gouvernements et oeuvrent dans le secteur public, mais aussi pour tout citoyen des fédérations du monde.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Utopia«

Utopia

fabula Verlag Hamburg


Thomas Morus (ca. 1478–1535) beschreibt in seinem Roman in Dialogform eine ideale Gesellschaft auf einer abgelegenen Insel. Dieser fiktiven Idylle stellt er die sozialen und gesellschaftlichen Missstände seiner Zeit gegenüber.

„Utopia“ ist ein Klassiker der politischen Philosophie und hat mit seinem Titel ein neues Genre der Literatur begründet.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Islamistische Drehscheibe Schweiz«

Islamistische Drehscheibe Schweiz

Neue Zürcher Zeitung NZZ Libro


Die Angst vor Terroranschlägen greift um sich und beginnt das Leben vieler Menschen zu dominieren. Dennoch versäumt

es die Politik, den Organisationen und Financiers, die den Nährboden zur Radikalisierung junger Muslime bereiten, das Handwerk zu legen. Saïda Keller-Messahli befasst sich seit Jahren mit den Islamverbänden und deren Moscheen in der Schweiz und in Europa und hat beunruhigende Entwicklungen aufgedeckt. Salafistische Wanderprediger und radikale Imame versuchen in Moscheen, mittels Lies!-Ständen und sogenannter Seelsorge in Gefängnissen, Flüchtlingsunterkünften und an Schulen Einfluss zu nehmen. Sie verbreiten eine erzkonservative Auslegung des Islams, die jede Erneuerung verhindert. Drahtzieher sind die reichen Golfstaaten, allen voran Saudi-Arabien und die dort gegründete Islamische Weltliga. Die Politik ist angesichts dieser globalen Netzwerke ratlos, die Behörden naiv – doch nur eine konsequente Politik der Nulltoleranz kann dem Treiben der Islamisten Einhalt gebieten.

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Saïda Keller-Messahli (* 1957) ist eine tunesisch-schweizerische Romanistin und islamische Menschenrechtsaktivistin. Sie ist Gründerin und Präsidentin des Forums für einen fortschrittlichen Islam.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Die Zukunft der Rebellion«

Die Zukunft der Rebellion

Aufbau Digital


„Nahezu alles Gute in dieser Welt ist das Ergebnis von Protesten und harten Kämpfen.“ Micah White.

Micah White, Mitbegründer von Occupy Wall Street, schreibt schonungslos selbstkritisch über seine Zeit in der aktiven Protestszene und zieht eine Bilanz der internationalen Protestgeschichte. Dabei stellt er fest: Protest allein kann Regierungen weder zum Zuhören noch zum Handeln zwingen. Wir brauchen eine neue Form der Rebellion. Wie das funktionieren kann, beschreibt Micah White rasant und eindrucksvoll in seinem Buch. Er liefert konkrete Strategien und Taktiken für eine erfolgreiche, weltweite Revolution. Seine Anleitung ist ein leidenschaftlicher Appell an alle Aktivisten der Zukunft.

„Micah White ist ein Stratege, eine neue Art Revolutionär.“ Andy Merryfield.

„Viele Bücher sagen uns, warum wir protestieren sollen, dieses Buch sagt uns, wie.“ J.B. MacKinnon.

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Micah White hat die Bewegung Occupy Wall Street mitgegründet. Er blickt auf über zwanzig Jahre innovativen Aktivismus zurück. Seine Essays und Interviews werden weltweit veröffentlicht. The New Yorker nannte ihn einen der einflussreichsten jungen Denker der heutigen Zeit. Micah White lebt mit Frau und Tochter in einer Kleinstadt an der Küste von Oregon

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Paradise Denied«

Paradise Denied

Bastei Entertainment


Zekarias Kebraeb was just seventeen when he fled his home in Eritrea in 2002 to escape his impending forced military service. To stay would have meant abuse, torture, and possibly even his death. Zekarias had no idea that his journey would span four years, and no concept of how brutal some of the choices along the way would be. He was marched through the wilderness, spent two weeks crossing the Sahara in a truck with no food and far too little water, and then traversed the Mediterranean Sea from Tripoli to Italy in a tiny rowboat.

But Zekarias is just one of 67 million refugees in the world today, according to a report by the UN Refugee Agency. Since the beginning of the year and the revolutions in North Africa, more than 30,000 people have fled the region. Behind each number, however, lies the fate of a human being.

PARADISE DENIED gives a face to the thousands of refugees who have no choice but leave behind their homes and risk their lives while hoping for a better destiny for themselves and their family.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Der unterschätzte Kontinent«

Der unterschätzte Kontinent

Bastei Entertainment


Bettina Gaus erzählt in einer faszinierenden Reisereportage von einem Kontinent, wie wir ihn noch nie gesehen haben. Und von den Menschen der Mittelschicht, die gar nicht so anders sind als wir.

In Afrika leben nur viele Arme, eine kleine korrupte Elite und Angehörige von Hilfsorganisationen? Falsch. Überall in Afrika gibt es eine Mittelschicht, Menschen, die uns ähnlicher sind, als wir glauben: Lehrer, Ärztinnen, Anwälte, Architekten, Journalistinnen, Tankstellenpächter. Sie haben die gleichen Wünsche und Sorgen wie wir: ein sicheres Einkommen, die richtige Schule für die Kinder, eine glückliche Ehe, beruflichen Aufstieg. Sie - und nicht die ausländischen Helfer - sind es, die Afrika zusammenhalten und verhindern, dass der ganze Kontinent im Chaos versinkt.

Für dieses Buch reiste Bettina Gaus durch 16 Länder südlich der Sahara - von Kenia, Tansania, Mozambique über Sambia und Angola bis hin zu Nigeria, Ghana und den Senegal. Sie sprach mit Menschen über deren Leben, die Zukunft ihrer Kinder und die Zukunft Afrikas.

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