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Light Light

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SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2014 GOVERNOR GENERAL'S AWARD FOR POETRY

Shortlisted for the 2014 Gerald Lampert Memorial Award

Finalist for the 2014 Goldie Awards: Poetry Category

Moving from the Enlightenment science of natural history to the contemporary science of global warming, Light Light is a provocative engagement with the technologies and languages that shape discourses of knowing. It bridges the histories of botany, empire, and mind to take up the claim of "objectivity" as the dissolution of a discrete self and thus explores the mind's movement toward and with the world. The poems in Light Light range from the epigrammatic to the experimental, from the narrative to the lyric, consistently exploring the way language captures the undulation of a mind’s working, how that rhythm becomes the embodiment of thought, and how that embodiment forms a politics engaged with the environment and its increasing alterations.

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Praise for Light Light:

The 19th-century Romantic poets, who are cited in Light Light, rhapsodized about nature as separate from humankind; in this era of climate change, Joosten reminds us there is no separation. – The Toronto Star

Light Light puts the hive back in the archive, the source in the resource. Through Joosten's miraculous mode of attending, through this mind that "grounds sound to seed," we are elemented – "The mind is a mood of electricity, warmth, water, and wind." We are given a mode of attending that is precarious, is an enactment of the precariousness we are and, with consequence, institute. Each thing this attention falls upon "is a source of thought, not its object." So everything is light once we learn to see by it. To honor the field we should “leave the field,” but this book we should never leave.

– Jane Gregory

A concordance that emerges as material, thought, and material thought, Julie Joosten's Light Light is a most beautiful and rare breed: as if H.D.'s Sea Garden mated with Erasmus Darwin's The Loves of the Plants. "I was to guard the valley, name it, speak to it by name," Joosten writes. Hers is a haunting lament. It is what love is. What could be more necessary at this time on this planet?

– Cara Benson

To get to the heart of Light Light is to ask whether these poems work, do they entertain, do they excite, do they teach, do they illuminate? Yes, yes, yes and yes again.

– Michael Dennis

Light Light is not light, but light-filled. Philosophical, lyrical, inventive, and erudite, precise and startlingly perceptive, it invites the reader to attend to wonder.

– Judges citation from The Gerald Lampert Memorial Award jury

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Julie Joosten is originally from Georgia but now lives in Toronto. She holds an MFA from the prestigious Iowa Writers Program and a PhD from Cornell University. Her poems and reviews can be read in Jacket 2, Tarpaulin Sky, the Malahat Review and The Fiddlehead. She recently guest edited an issue of BafterC, a journal of contemporary poetry. Light Light is her first book.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Endangered Hydrocarbons«

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Endangered Hydrocarbons

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Fracking – tar-sand runoff – dirty oil extraction. This is the language of our oil-addicted 21st century society: incredibly invasive, blatant in its purpose, and richly embedded in mythological and archetypal symbolism. The ultimate goal of the industry: To core the underworld.

Endangered Hydrocarbons, Lesley Battler's first full-length collection of poetry, shows that the language of hydrocarbon extraction, with its blend of sexual imagery, archetype, science, pseudoscience and the purely speculative, can be as addictive as the resource it pursues.

Using pastiche and wordplay, Battler shines a floodlight on the absurdity and pervasiveness of production language in all areas of human life in the oil fields, including art, culture and politics. Incorporating texts generated by a multinational oil company, and spliced with a variety of found material (video games, home decor magazines, works by Henry James and Carl Jung), Battler deliberately tampers with her found material, treating it as crude oil—excavating, mixing, and drilling these texts to emulate extraction processes used by the industry.With traces of Dennis Lee's Testament, Larissa Lai's Automaton Biographies, and Adam Dickinson's The Polymers, this lively and refreshing take on a polarizing topic will resonate with readers of contemporary poetry who connect with environmental issues and capitalist critique.

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PRAISE FOR LESLEY BATTLER

Electric and unexpected... Lesley Battler's "Idylls of Inuvik" [is] a zinger of a poem that uses the internal, molecular energy of words to enact a merciless takedown of the still-colonial attitudes at play in the economics of Canada's North.

—Anita Lahey, Arc Poetry Magazine

Lesley Battler's cut-up work will continue to remind me that it will always be easier to remove overburden than it will be to clear-cut a small forest. Her work brings us the spectacle of the wars of rhetoric—with their victors & victims of ideology, hijacking knowledge and power with 'approved terms of vocabulary.

— Paul Zits, filling Station

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Born in Barrie, Ontario, Lesley Battler's work has been published in Alberta Views, Arc, Arc (Quarc issue), Contemporary Verse 2, dandelion, filling Station, Matrix, Other Voices, PRISM international, and west coast line. She won the PRISM international Earle Birney award (2012), and the University of Calgary Poem of the Season award (2009) for a poem that became part of Endangered Hydrocarbons. Battler received an MA in English from Concordia University, and currently lives in Calgary, where she works in the petrochemical industry.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Otolith«

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Otolith

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Winner, 2018 League of Canadian Poets Gerald Lampert Memorial Award

Longlisted, 2018 League of Canadian Poets Pat Lowther Memorial Award

Otolith — the ear stone — is a series of bones that help us to orient ourselves in space. In Otolith, Emily Nilsen attempts a similar feat in poetry: to turn the reader's attention to their relationship to the world, revealing an intertidal state between the rootedness of place and the uncertainty and tenuousness of human connection. Born in the fecundity of British Columbia's coastal rainforest, these poems are full of life and decay; they carry the odours of salmon rivers and forests of fir; salal growing in the fog-bound mountain slopes.

This astonishing debut, at once spare and lush, displays an exquisite lyricism built on musical lines and mature restraint. Nilsen turns over each idea carefully, letting nothing escape her attention and saying no more than must be said. Combining a scientist's precision and a poet's sensitivity, Otolith examines the ache of nostalgia in the relentless passage of time.

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"Otolith is a house built by gravity and movement, at once weighty and ephemeral. These poems are fogged in and present, placed and displaced. Nilsen is a poet of the interstitial, of longing, of the sensitive shift itself."

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"Spend enough time at a remote research station, suggests Emily Nilsen, and you, too, will identify fifty different species of fog. In Otolith, Nilsen’s poems measure all that environmental science cannot: the alignment of a tree planter’s sensibility to charred forest, the geolocation of grief. Wake before dawn and follow Nilsen’s ‘solitary, rugged route’ into our fragile ecology."

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"Otolith challenges the idea that madness is doing the same thing over and over, expecting different results. With metaphors and imagery as wild as the ecologies she encounters, Emily Nilsen shows that repeating the same question can yield multiple answers: Otolith’s world is not static, won’t hold still for its photograph, doesn’t sit pretty. And this is its virtue."

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Emily Nilsen was born and raised in Vancouver. She has published poems in PRISM International, Lake, and The Goose, and in a chapbook entitled Place, No Manual. Nilsen was a finalist for the CBC Poetry Prize in 2015, after have been longlisted for the prize on three separate occasions. Her work has also been longlisted for the UK National Poetry Prize. She lives in Nelson, BC.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »How to Draw a Rhinoceros«

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How to Draw a Rhinoceros

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How to Draw a Rhinoceros, the first book of poems by Canadian writer, scholar, and lawyer Kate Sutherland, mines centuries of rhinoceros representations in art and literature to document the history of European and North American encounters with the animal&madsh;from the elephant–rhinoceros battles staged by monarchs in the Middle Ages; the rhinomania that took hold in France and later in Italy in response to the European travels of Clara the 'Dutch' Rhinoceros in the mid-1700s; the menageries and circuses of the Victorian era; the exploits of celebrated twentieth-century hunters like Teddy Roosevelt and Ernest Hemingway; and the trade in rhinoceros horn artefacts that thrives online today. Along the way, it explores themes of colonialism, animal welfare, and conservation.

Sutherland was inspired on this poetic path by Clara, an eighteenth-century rhinoceros she first encountered in porcelain form in an exhibit of ceramic animals at Toronto's Gardiner Museum. This chance experience set her off on a grand quest to learn all she could of Clara's story, and resulted in a collection that combines Robert Kroetschian documentary poetics with the meticulous research and environmental passion of Elizabeth Kolbert, to successfully examine the centuries-long path of the rhinoceros that's brought it to the brink of global extinction.

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Praise for How to Draw a Rhinoceros:

"Kate Sutherland has created a surprising, beautiful and often tragic menagerie of poems about a powerful, peaceful beast that has the misfortune of being both magnificent and magnificently horned. Her brilliant resurrection of 18th-century rhinosuperstar Clara is an enchanting bonus." —Stuart Ross, author of A Hamburger in a Gallery and A Sparrow Came Down Resplendent"Kate Sutherland writes a book of poems with the understanding that the colonial encounter requires a deliberate destruction of the colonized. In How to Draw a Rhinoceros, Sutherland draws upon historical documents and imagined perspectives to present a palimpsest that maps imperialist invasion, European plunder of brown and black countries, kidnapping, murder, and enslavement. In other words, the poems reveal the true face of empire. In verse that invents, alludes, and allows for considerable vivid delving, the poems present and speak back to white violence and a colonialism that framed and imprisoned those that they conquered (including people) as exploited 'exotics' for European appetites." —Hoa Nguyen, author of As Long as Trees Last

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Kate Sutherland was born in Scotland, grew up in Saskatchewan, and now lives in Toronto, where she is a professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. She is the author of two collections of short stories: Summer Reading (winner of a Saskatchewan Book Award for Best First Book) and All In Together Girls. How to Draw a Rhinoceros is Sutherland's first collection of poems.

 
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a thin line between

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In what can be described as a verse-novel for its lyricism and rhythmic structure, Wanda Praamsma crafts a story that transcends geographic boundaries and time periods, by weaving together lives from her own family's past, including her poet-grandfather and sculptor-uncle. Subtle in its life lessons, a thin line between  works at 'peeling away the I's' to explore concepts of self and family in flux. What emerges is a poignant, and at times humorous, portrait of a Dutch-Canadian family and a close look into a young woman's exploration of her own being and creative life.

Praamsma's writing draws comparisons to popular Canadian writers like Elizabeth Bachinsky, Phil Hall, and Daphne Marlatt, and will appeal to readers in their 20s and 30s who are coming to terms with issues of parenting and family, as they negotiate the spaces for their own individual lives and their creative selves.

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Praise for a thin line between:

 Few books are so gracefully themselves: a thin line between accomplishes an atmosphere that seems enigmatically familiar, complex and unassuming. It is, in part, an intimate and oblique portrait of a major Dutch poet, but even more so, it's an exploration of how we should live. The doors in this poem lie between inner and outer worlds, family members, places, life and art – and the speaker's curiosity and candour leave them wide open.

  – Sadiqa de Meijer

 

  Mixing shapes, genre and line break into a multi-layered poem (long poem and dozens of little poems), a thin line between is within and without, it opens like a door, and moves through family, love, "the mysterious he," language, and all those other lives we have lived. It conveys the beauty of crafting our own selves, edits and all, and asks the questions: "What is this place i come from?" "Where is it i am going?" and most importantly, "How am i going to write about it?"

  – Katherena Vermette

 

  Conversational, associative on many levels, Wanda Praamsma's long poem pulls a reader in to what is both said and unspoken.  a thin line between probes the dualities of resemblance and difference, here and there, leaving the door of her heart ajar in its testing of interconnections within this highly creative Dutch family.

  – daphne marlatt

 

  a thin line between balances the intimacy of personal narrative and memory with a sweeping meditation on experience and language. By reflecting on the relationship and inherent tensions between "without" and "within," it locates the hidden pause within even the most fleeting, seemingly ordinary, moments.

  – Johanna Skibsrud

 

A thin line between lives up to [its] promise &ndash it has plenty of fizz. &ndash Toronto Star

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Wanda Praamsma grew up in the Ottawa valley in Clayton, Ontario. Her poetry has appeared in Ottawater, 17 seconds, and Feathertale, and several literary non-fiction pieces have appeared in the Toronto Star, where she worked for several years as an editor. She has worked, studied, and lived at various points in Salamanca, Spain, Santiago, Chile, and Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and has travelled to many places in between and beyond, including Cuba, India, and the Balkans. Praamsma currently lives in Kingston, ON, and is working on an MFA in Creative Writing through the University of British Columbia. a thin line between is her first book of poetry. Find Praamsma at www.whywandawrites. com, or connect with her on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/wpraamsma.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Better Nature«

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Better Nature

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Much of the language that makes up Better Nature—the first poetry collection by writer and academic Fenn Stewart—is drawn from a diary that Walt Whitman wrote while travelling through Canada at the end of the nineteenth century.

But rather than waxing poetic about the untouched Great White North, Stewart inlays found materials (early settler archives, news stories, email spam, fundraising for environmental NGOs, and more) to present a unique view of Canada's "pioneering" attitude towards "wilderness"—one that considers deeper issues of the settler appropriation of Indigenous lands, the notion of terra nullius, and the strategies and techniques used to produce a "better nature" (that is, one that better serves the nation).

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Priase for Better Energy:

"With linguistic fervor, dancing intellect, and blissful urgency Stewart unveils the seemingly everyday horrors of our cruelly optimistic (would be) unsettling lands." —Liz Howard, Griffin Poetry Prize-winning author of Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent

" These vibrant, looping poems call on readers to wander through error as Stewart exposes the colonial hankerings that underpin the vocabularies of natural science, of romantic poetry, of the confession. Nobody is off the hook: not reader, not writer. Stewart is a riveting poet unafraid to cut directly to our most urgent mess and to insist that the reader do something about it beyond the page." —Shannon Maguire, author of fur(l) parachute and Myrmurs

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Fenn Stewart lives in Vancouver, where she teaches literature, writing, and research. Her poetry has appeared in The Capilano Review, Open Letter, The Arcadia Project, and in the form of three chapbooks, An OK Organ Man (shortlisted for the 2013 bpNichol Chapbook Award), Vegetable Inventory, and from Waltzing. Her research on Canadian culture and literature has appeared in various journals, including ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature and Law, Culture, and the Humanities. Better Nature is Stewart's first book of poetry.

 
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Buoyancy Control

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Buoyancy Control, the latest collection of poems from Vancouverite Adrienne Gruber, explores themes of sexuality, sexual identity, and queerness, while confronting the feelings of loss and longing found in relationships, and the chance glimpse into a new life, while still recovering from a painfully failed connection.

Metaphors of oceans, lakes, and other bodies of water, as well as the creatures that inhabit those spaces, swim and swirl their way through Gruber's languid poems, which are divided into two evocative sections. Though distinguished by their own prologue poems, both sections reveal details of the narrator's examination of life, but from two different perspectives: Section 1, Terra Firma, is an exploration of place, of what we consider solid and secure, and how solidity can betray us. In contrast, Section 2, A mari usque ad maria, brings the reader into themes of water and the fluidity of identity, particularly sexual identity and queerness.

This is an honest, at times humorous, and revealing look inside the mind and body of a woman manoeuvring through experiences of longing, loss, and the fluidity of sexual identity, only to come out on the other side a more forgiving being from the journey.

Fans of Karen Solie's powerfully feminist and unapologetic poetic voice, as well as the playful sarcasm and grit of Alison Calder's Wolf Tree, will glory in Gruber's fascinating culmination of land and sea, mind and body, in Buoyancy Control.

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Praise for Buoyancy Control:

"Akin to the Indonesian mimic octopus, the poems in Buoyancy Control 'ascend from the ocean floor,' and proceed to evolve with an uncommon beauty. Both starkly sexual and aposematic, Adrienne Gruber's second book is remarkably controlled, framing the human condition in a world that's constantly shifting. Buoyancy Control is a fearless collection from one of Canada's best emerging poets." —Jim Johnstone, author of Dog Ear

"Densely, disturbingly erotic, Adrienne Gruber's Buoyancy Control is not a book for the faint of heart. Gruber's erotic reach encompasses the world entire, from undersea creatures to the human body of the beloved. No Hallmark sweetness in this collection—here is a fierce, wet, pulsing hunger, though there is an acute sensitivity in these observations, whether of childbirth, cold-water swimming, or other moments of convulsion and transformation so powerful that they transcend intellect. Here are poems that burst like fireworks, 'all thought blasted into the night sky.'" —Rachel Rose, Poet Laureate of Vancouver, author of Marry and Burn

"The lust and loneliness that muscle us between open water and inky depth vie for power in Buoyancy Control. Gruber's poems consume aqua life, roadkill, citrus, hotel beds, and dock-edge gargoyles as fuel for 'spit-shined' words that surface as moans and as 'sharp, atomized shrieks.' Plaintive, ecstatic, carnal, these pieces often wonder whether we’re 'complete on our own,' while veering between the urgency of self-pleasure, the defensiveness of self-containment, and the wound of self-reflexivity. Plumbing the digestive debris that skates the sea floor, Gruber's poems muck about with our equilibrium. We rise and sink lured by shadowscapes, pleasurelands and the hunt for a healthy gravity." —Brecken Hancock, author of Broom Broom, winner of the 2015 Trillium Book Award for Poetry

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Adrienne Gruber is the author of the poetry collection This is the Nightmare (2008; shortlisted for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry) and three chapbooks: Intertidal Zones (2014), Mimic (2012; winner of a bpNichol Chapbook Award), and Everything Water (2011). Her work has appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Grain, Event, Arc Poetry Magazine, Poetry is Dead, and Plentitude. She has been a finalist for the CBC Literary Awards in poetry, Descant's Winston Collins Best Canadian Poem Contest, and twice for Arc's Poem of the Year Contest. Her poem "Gestational Trail" was awarded first prize in The Antigonish Review's Great Blue Heron Poetry Contest in 2015. Gruber lives in Vancouver with her partner Dennis and their two daughters.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »A Step in the Right Direction«

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A Step in the Right Direction

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In A Step in the Right Direction, Søndergaard continues a line of thought he first developed in Bees Die Sleeping and continued in Vinci, Later (which was published in English in 2005). This new collection is "about" walking. It contains four major cohesive songs or cantos, each of which explores the act of walking from a different point of view: as a social activity, as an act of love, as a condition for thought, and as inspiration for art.

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Praise for Praise for Morten SØndergaard: For now we have, and a collection of poems so worthy of your attention and attachment that it bears repeating again and again, with rising urgency, how good this book is. – Seth Abramson, Huffington Post Morten Søndergaard carefully brushes the lint off our shoulders, then crouches behind the controls of his poems and does everything to dislodge us from our feet. As doomful and slapstick as Beckett, he gives voice to the ground we stomp all over, and the stuff aside from people that peoples our world. – Stuart Ross That everyday life would find its way into Søndergaard’s poetry was demonstrated by his earlier masterpiece Vinci, Later. Now it has come to stay. A Step in the Right Direction is not just a step forward, but a giant leap into a much larger realm for this poet. It is, without having to say much else, an instant classic. – Tue Andersen Nexø, Information With Morten Søndergaard, you find yourself in a world of wide open curiosity. You are travelling, you are on the move, and yet Søndergaard’s poems are like statues carved in Italian marble. – Bjorn Breden, Politiken Morten Søndergaard stands out as the heir to Inger Christensen. If one argues that a poet's primary task is to walk out into the world with eyes wide open and pass on impressions and thoughts through a tireless linguistic curiosity prism, then Morten Søndergaard’s A Step in the Right Direction is the work of an exemplary poet. – Kim Skotte, Politiken

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Morten Søndergaard (born 1964) is a part of a generation of Danish poets that emerged in the early Nineties. Søndergaard's first collection of poetry, Sahara i mine h¾nder (Sahara In My Hands) was published in 1992. This debut collection has been followed by a succession of works which have won him both critical acclaim and a number of literary awards. Morten Søndergard's most recent publication is Processen og det halve kongerige (The Process and Half the Kingdom) (2010). His books have been translated into Arabic, English, German, French, Italian, Serbian and Swedish. In the spring of 2012 he published his second collection of poetry in English, titled A Step in the Right Direction, translated by Barbara J. Haveland

 
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All the Gold Hurts My Mouth

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Winner, 2017 ReLit Award

Katherine Leyton's fresh and vibrant debut collection takes on the sexual politics of the twenty-first century, boldly holding up a mirror to the male gaze and interrogating the nature of images and illusions.

Confronting the forces of mass communication — whether television, movies, or the Internet — Leyton explores the subtle effects of the media on our perceptions and interactions, including the pain of alienation and the threat of violence simmering just below the surface.

And yet, for all its unflinching and raw lyricism, the poetry of All the Gold Hurts My Mouth is warm and searching, full of humour and hope. Engaging her readers with lush vocabulary and spare, tightly controlled forms, Leyton's poems become a rich quest for identity, authenticity, and nature uncorrupted. Reaching gloriously from isolation and pain to connection with love, Leyton channels the wit of feminists past to create a manifesto for our time, an affirmation of what might be possible.

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"Leyton's voice is both enigmatic and unabashed, delving into the mysteries of selfhood while offering a vivid meditation on what it means to be a woman alive today. A fearless, urgent, and beautifully wrought debut."

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"An outstanding debut, filled with complicated yet still vivid imagery. Leyton's lines lift off the page to throttle you."

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"In this fierce debut, Leyton explores women as palaces and grand pianos, gleaming objects admired and shattered. Through her lyrically exuberant voice, whirring with musicality and subversive jabs, art becomes a looking glass. Just as 'women hum to drown their hunger,' these poems bring the salve of self-creation to their reader."

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"Katherine Leyton debuts with a brash, provocative collection centred around how women are seen by men, as expressed in popular culture, and how women internalize that male gaze."

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Katherine Leyton was the inaugural writer-in-residence at the Al & Eurithe Purdy A-Frame in the summer of 2014. Her poetry and non-fiction have appeared in numerous publications, including the Malahat Review, Hazlitt, the Globe and Mail, and the Edinburgh Review. She is also the founder of the highly unorthodox video poetry blog, HowPedestrian.ca. A native of Toronto, Leyton has lived in Rome, Montreal, Edinburgh, and Forli.

 
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Charm

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A charm can protect, inflict or influence.

Charm, the second collection by poet Christine McNair, considers the craftwork of conception from a variety of viewpoints—from pregnancy and motherhood, to how an orchid is pollinated, to overcoming abusive relationships, to the manual artistry of carving a violin bow or marbling endpapers.

Through these works, McNair's poetic line evolves as if moving in a spellbound kaleidoscope, etched with omens, fairytales, intimacy's stickiness, and the mothering body.

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Praise for Charm

"McNair's Charm is unyielding. Replete with precision, elegance and power, an attentive intensity thrives in these poems. She is fearless in her examination of how impermanent objects are treated—of how we ourselves are objects. What lingers is a provocative sensuality, preserved from intimacies, inherent vices, destructive influences, harms, and decay. Her Charm is stunning and alchemical." —Sandra Ridley, author of Silvija and The Counting House

"Christine McNair's Charm is a textile bracelet stitched together with a gasp an echo a tune that will catch at your pumpernickel heart. Jubilantly sample the starched linen and cloth pages as these poems embolden you to bite into its promiscuous orchids and chew on the enchanted, hanked-tone stanzas." —Nicole Markotić, author of whelmed and Bent at the Spine

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Christine McNair is the author of Conflict (BookThug, 2012; finalist for the City of Ottawa Book Award, the Archibald Lampman Award, and the ReLit Award, and shortlisted for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry) and pleasantries and other misdemeanours (2013; shortlisted for the bpNichol chapbook award). Her work has appeared in Arc Poetry Magazine, CV2, Descant, Poetry is Dead, Prairie Fire, and other places. McNair lives in Ottawa, where she works as a book doctor.

 
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