Logo weiterlesen.de
Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land«

Leseprobe vom

An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land

Athabasca University Press


In 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the Algonquian communities—who hosted and tolerated the fur traders—and later, the missionaries, anthropologists, and others who found their way into Indigenous lives and territories. The eighteen essays gathered in this book explore Brown’s investigations into the surprising range of interactions among Indigenous people and newcomers as they met or observed one another from a distance, and as they competed, compromised, and rejected or adapted to change.

While diverse in their subject matter, the essays have thematic unity in their focus on the old HBC territory and its peoples from the 1600s to the present. More than an anthology, the chapters of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land provide examples of Brown’s exceptional skill in the close study of texts, including oral documents, images, artifacts, and other cultural expressions. The volume as a whole represents the scholarly evolution of one of the leading ethnohistorians in Canada and the United States.

---

"A welcome and compelling selection of articles (some previously published, some unpublished) that focus on the stories of Cree, Ojibwe and Métis peoples, Hudson’s Bay and Northwest Company fur traders, Methodist and Anglican missionaries,and twentieth-century anthropologists. [...] The varied thematic foci of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land allow readers to delve into topics and issues related to language, family, marriage, women, and Indigenous stories and memories. Each chapter is of interest in its own right, but gathered here each becomes part of a larger narrative of a lifetime of scholarship and contributions by one of the most important practitioners in her field."

---

"Brown's clear narrative writing style makes this collection accessible to both academic and public audiences. Historians will appreciate her close and thorough reading of primary sources. Anthropologists will recognize Brown's attention to language and her reading of the historical record through an ethnographic lens that can focus on both the micro-scales of domestic life and the macro-scales of the fur trade's political economy."

---

"Brown's ability to read between the lines of texts of all kinds is without parallel in Canadian ethnohistory. The articles are a pleasure to read, full of insight and analysis, and written with the agreeable style of a born communicator and teacher. [...] Brown's work continues to impress and influence."

---

Jennifer S. H. Brown taught history at the University of Winnipeg for twenty-eight years and held a Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal history from 2004 to 2011. She served as director of the Centre for Rupert’s Land Studies, which focuses on Aboriginal peoples and the fur trade of the Hudson Bay watershed, from 1996 to 2010. She is the editor of the Rupert’s Land Record Society documentary series (McGill-Queen’s University Press), which publishes original materials on Aboriginal and fur trade history. She now resides in Denver, Colorado, where she continues her scholarly work.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Apron Strings«

Leseprobe vom

Apron Strings

Goose Lane Editions


Shortlisted, 2018 Taste Canada Awards

Shortlisted, 2018 Writers' Federation of New Brunswick Book Award for Non-Fiction

Longlisted, 2018 RBC Taylor Prize

Jan Wong knows food is better when shared, so when she set out to write a book about home cooking in France, Italy, and China, she asked her 22-year-old son, Sam, to join her. While he wasn't keen on spending excessive time with his mom, he dreamed of becoming a chef. Ultimately, it was an opportunity he couldn't pass up.

On their journey, Jan and Sam live and cook with locals, seeing first-hand how globalization is changing food, families, and cultures. In southeast France, they move in with a family sheltering undocumented migrants. From Bernadette, the housekeeper, they learn classic French family fare such as blanquette de veau. In a hamlet in the heart of Italy's Slow Food country, the villagers teach them without fuss or fanfare how to make authentic spaghetti alle vongole and a proper risotto with leeks. In Shanghai, they home-cook firecracker chicken and scallion pancakes with the nouveaux riches and their migrant maids, who comprise one of the biggest demographic shift in world history. Along the way, mother and son explore their sometimes-fraught relationship, uniting — and occasionally clashing — over their mutual love of cooking.

A memoir about family, an exploration of the globalization of food cultures, and a meditation on the complicated relationships between mothers and sons, Apron Strings is complex, unpredictable, and unexpectedly hilarious.

---

"Sharp-eyed and intrepid, Jan Wong and her resourceful son Sam investigate at first-hand what happens in three cultures where people are renowned for practising and enjoying great culinary art as normal daily custom. The resulting report, spiced as it is with honesty and wit, lays out for us a rich and thought-provoking spread."

---

"Apron strings may be for foodies, but Jan Wong’s Apron Strings is for everyone."

---

"Jan Wong takes us on a trip through three of the world’s greatest cuisines to learn the secrets of their foods, as well as the civilizations—past and present—that underlies what they eat. From a farm family in France coping with globalization to the stubborn traditions of central Italy and the cultural confusion of today’s China, we meet the families and people behind the dishes—and learn how to make them as well. A wonderful story about Jan’s own efforts to bond with her son, Apron Strings is what we have come to expect from Jan Wong: funny, insightful, and brutally honest."

---

"For foodies like me, Jan’s book will be irresistible, but the fact is that anyone would love this book. Apron Strings is one of the most appealing, charming, loveable books I’ve read in years."

---

"Clever, inspirational, and absolutely decadent."

---

"A sharp-minded—and famously sharp-tongued—reporter drags her fully grown, chef-trained son on a homestay cooking tour of France, Italy, and China. What could possibly not go wrong? Inquisitive, caustic, delicious, and can’t-look-away entertaining, this is Jan Wong at the peak of her powers."

---

"Wong’s keen journalistic eye makes for a fascinating, fact-filled journey from farmhouses in Drôme-Provençal to upscale condos in Shanghai."

---

"Good stories, compellingly told."

---

"Irresistible in its charm."

---

"A fun and fiesty journey through three great culinary cultures around the world. Jan Wong's keen attention to detail and sense of humour make for a captivating read."

---

"I couldn’t put it down."

---

"If you’re hungry for travel but can’t get away, this should be at the top of your 'must-read' list."

---

"Maybe the world could use one more culinary memoir, after all. Possibly even more, if they’re all as good as this one."

---

Jan Wong is the author of five non-fiction bestsellers, including Out of the Blue and Red China Blues, named one of Time magazine's top ten non-fiction books of 1996. (Twenty years later, the book is still in print.) She has won numerous journalism awards and is now a professor of journalism at St. Thomas University. A third-generation Canadian, Jan is the eldest daughter of a prominent Montreal restaurateur.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Un historien dans la cité«

Leseprobe vom

Un historien dans la cité

Les Presses de l'Université d'Ottawa | Amérique française


À la fois témoin et acteur des grandes transformations socio-identitaires qui ont marqué l’Ontario français depuis la fin des années 1960, Gaétan Gervais est aussi connu à titre de créateur du drapeau franco-ontarien en 1975.

Les divers lieux d’enracinement de sa pensée sont étudiés depuis le Sudbury français des années 1940 et 1950, en passant par le contexte de mutations culturelles, politiques et historiographiques des décennies d’après-guerre. L’étude s’étend au contenu des écrits de l’historien ainsi qu’à ses interventions dans les sphères publique et gouvernementale de l’Ontario et de la francophonie canadienne, notamment au regard de l’éducation postsecondaire.

L’analyse fait ressortir les paramètres structurants de sa pensée et montre comment celle-ci opère dans l’espace propre au milieu minoritaire francoontarien. Elle fait apparaître l’historien comme l’une des principales figures énonciatrices d’une représentation identitaire axée sur une continuité référentielle avec la mémoire du Canada français historique.

---

Un des penseurs les plus influents de l’Ontario

français a fait l’objet d’une «biographie intellectuelle» intitulée Un

historien dans la cité : Gaétan Gervais et l’Ontario français. Cet essai de François-Olivier Dorais demeure un jalon

majeur de l’historiographie de l’Ontario français, voire du Canada français. 

---

« une plume alerte et élégante (…) une réflexion féconde (…) un ouvrage appelé à devenir une référence sur l’histoire intellectuelle de l’Ontario français, et de l’un des derniers grands penseurs du Canada français. »

---

Alors que le lecteur pourrait s’attendre à l’un de ces ouvrages très académiques avec la lourdeur qui les caractérise, l’auteur, de par son style, clair et précis, et son intention première de partager sa lecture du cheminement d’un historien, parvient à stimuler et à soutenir notre intérêt pour cet historien marquant de l’Ontario français. (...) Le lecteur trouvera certainement beaucoup de satisfaction dans la lecture des nombreux extraits provenant de publications ou d’interventions de Gervais. (...) Pour conclure, cet ouvrage de Dorais devrait être un outil de compréhension de l’Ontario français pour toute personne qui vibre avec cette collectivité.

---

Cette étude de François-Olivier Dorais, doctorant en histoire à l’Université de Montréal, ne présente pas l’homme, l’historien sudburois, mais plutôt sa pensée et comment elle a évolué au fil d’une carrière d’un demi-siècle pour influencer d’autres chercheurs et intellectuels ainsi que l’identité franco-ontarienne. (...) La pensée de Gaétan Gervais demeure d’actualité. La revendication de l’université de langue française continue et vit une autre étape critique. Le conseil de planification pour cette université, dirigé par Dyane Adam, doit déposer prochainement son rapport à ce sujet.

---

L’étude historiographique que propose

M. Dorais dans Un historien

dans la cité, une adaptation de sa

thèse de maitrise, se veut aussi une

analyse de l’engagement

de l’intellectuel en milieu

minoritaire. «L’expérience

de la minorisation

et de la fragilité des communautés

minoritaires

pose chez les intellectuels

plus qu’ailleurs la

nécessité de justifier leur

existence dans l’espace et

dans le temps.

---

Portrait d’un défenseur de l’identité franco-ontarienne 

Il n’y a pas que le Québec francophone qui est aux prises avec la question identitaire, la communauté franco-ontarienne de

même. Et qui cherche à prendre sa place dans la mouvance de la mondialisation. Il y aurait bien des avenues pour parler des

enjeux auxquels est confronté le fait français en Ontario. L’historien François-Olivier Dorais a privilégié la vie et

l’oeuvre de Gaétan Gervais une figure marquante du combat pour la défense de la francophonie dans la province voisine. Il

n’est pas connu comme il se doit au Québec. Un historien dans la cité rend justice à cet homme de droiture animé d’une ferveur

sans pareille pour que le fait français demeure bien vivant chez lui.

 

---

François-Olivier Dorais est doctorant au Département d’histoire de l’Université de Montréal.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Wessen Erinnerung zählt?«

Leseprobe vom

Wessen Erinnerung zählt?

HOFFMANN UND CAMPE VERLAG GmbH


Als das Deutsche Reich am 28. Juni 1919 den Vertrag von Versailles unterzeichnete, gingen die überseeischen Kolonien an die Siegermächte des Ersten Weltkriegs über. Lange vergessen, kehrt die Kolonialperiode in Ländern wie Namibia, Kamerun oder Ruanda in den letzten Jahren in die Erinnerung zurück. Was bedeutet dieses Wiederauftauchen für die Bundesrepublik? Müsste in der »postkolonialen« Sichtweise nicht auch das deutsche Eroberungsstreben in Richtung Osten eine Rolle spielen? Die neue Erinnerungskultur hat gravierende Auswirkungen für das Selbstverständnis eines Landes, dessen Bevölkerung immer diverser wird. Der lange Schatten der deutschen »Kulturmission« findet sich heute etwa im Umgang mit der »Schuldenkrise«, mit Migration und Flucht und im alltäglichen Rassismus.

Mark Terkessidis, renommierter Migrations- und Rassismusforscher, macht mit seinem Blick in die Vergangenheit aktuelle Debatten nachvollziehbar und zeigt, an welchen Stellen sie in eine neue Richtung gelenkt werden müssen. Zudem macht er sichtbar, welche Fragen sich ergeben, wenn auch die Erinnerung jener zählt, die eingewandert und damit Teil der Gesellschaft geworden sind.

---

»Insgesamt sticht Terkessidis im vielstimmigen Chor jener, die derzeit über koloniale Vergangenheit reden und schreiben, durch seinen weiten Blick hervor.«

---

»Gedankenreich und brillant formuliert.«

---

»Meisterhaft.«

---

»Dem Berliner Historiker und Journalisten Terkessidis ist hier ein wichtiger Anstoß gelungen, den Begriff des deutschen Kolonialismus aus dem beengten Rahmen des 19. Jahrhunderts zu lösen.«

---

»Produktiv wie spannend.«

---

»Ein erhellendes und gut geschriebenes Buch.

Ein kluges Buch über Erinnerung und Demokratie.«

---

»Terkessidis zeigt klar wie keiner vor ihm, wie gerade in Deutschland der Rassismus als Grundprinzip des Kolonialismus weiterlebt, viel weniger beachtet und geächtet als in anderen Ländern.«

---

»Herr Terkessides leuchtet viele Ecken der Geschichte des Rassismus und der Kolonialzeit Deutschlands aus. Dieses Licht ist wichtig, damit die Tatsachen überhaupt zu erkennen sind. [...]  Es ist angenehm zu lesen und äußerst informativ«

---

»Ein so komplexes Thema zu behandeln, verlangt Mut und historische Sachkenntnis.«

---

»anregende Lektüre«

---

Mark Terkessidis, geboren 1966, ist freier Autor und hat u. a. für taz, Tagesspiegel, Die Zeit und Süddeutsche Zeitung geschrieben sowie Radiobeiträge für den Deutschlandfunk verfasst und im WDR-Radio moderiert. Er promovierte über die Banalität des Rassismus und unterrichtete an den Universitäten Köln, Rotterdam und St. Gallen. Zuletzt veröffentlichte er Interkultur (2010), Kollaboration (2015) und Nach der Flucht (2017). Er lebt in Berlin.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen