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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Die Nightingale Schwestern«

Leseprobe vom

Die Nightingale Schwestern

Lübbe


London, 1914. Als drei junge Frauen ihre Ausbildung am Londoner Nightingale Hospital beginnen, geht für jede von ihnen ein Traum in Erfüllung. Doch für ihr persönliches Glück müssen sie Opfer bringen. Während die aus einfachsten Verhältnissen stammende Sadie alles daransetzt, ihre Herkunft zu verbergen, erfährt Sonnenschein Anna zum ersten Mal, was es heißt, nicht dazuzugehören. Und Kate, die wie ihre Brüder Medizin studieren will, muss gegen den erbitterten Widerstand ihres Vaters kämpfen ...

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Sisters of Prophecy«

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Sisters of Prophecy

BWL Publishing Inc.


The Shipton history is--well--complicated. Some families have a guardian angel. The Shiptons have a guardian ancestor, one who jumps right in, boots first, whenever one of her girls has a problem. Of course, Mother Shipton's girls aren't always limited by blood ties. They're connected by power, shared and used wisely. That power needs to get busy, too, or Katherine's oilman fiancé is going to disappear for good in the Gulf of Mexico, Katherine's best friend Sylvia is never going to reconnect with her childhood soul mate, and cousin Irene's wedding plans to world champion saddle bronc rider Matt Dillon (yep, that's his real name) will end up down the drain. It's a good thing Mother has family troubleshooter Lillian to help her in this century. These girls get themselves into more trouble than a time-jumping family guardian can handle all by herself

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You're gonna love Mother Shipton! Hold on to your hat, you're in for a wild ride!

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Jude Pittman is the author of the popular romantic suspense series "A Murder State of Mind" Deadly Secrets, Deadly Betrayal and Deadly Consequences, as well as the novella Healing Spirits.

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Gail Roughton is a native of small town Georgia whose Deep South heritage features prominently in much of her work. She’s a retired paralegal who lived in a law office for over forty years, during which time she raised three children and quite a few attorneys. She kept herself more or less sane by writing novels and tossing the completed manuscripts into her closet, most of which have now emerged in published form. A cross-genre writer, her books range from humor to romance to thriller to horror and she’s never quite sure what to expect when she sits down at the keyboard. Now multi-published by Books We Love, Ltd., her credits include the War-N-Wit, Inc. series, my name be Cain…and my color be Se’ben, Vanished, and Country Justice, the first book in the Southern Justice series. Currently, she’s working on Black Turkey Walk, the second Southern Justice novel. Gail sends special thanks to her husband, children and grandchildren for (usually) leaving her alone when she’s staring at her computer screen and to Books We Love for making dreams come true.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Töchter des Nordlichts«

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Töchter des Nordlichts

beHEARTBEAT


Durch ein Jahrhundert getrennt, durch eine gemeinsame Geschichte vereint ...

Finnmark, 1915. Mit neun Jahren endet das friedliche Nomadenleben des Sámi-Mädchens Áilu: Auf der Wanderung zu den Sommerweiden wird sie von norwegischen Beamten verschleppt und in ein Internat gesteckt, wo sie zu einem zivilisierten Mädchen geformt werden soll. Tatsächlich verleugnet Áilu lange ihre Herkunft. Doch der Ruf ihrer Heimat lässt sich nicht unterdrücken ...

Oslo, Gegenwart. Nora ist Mitte dreißig, als sie den Namen ihres Vaters erfährt: Ánok war ein samischer Student, der damals plötzlich aus dem Leben ihrer Mutter verschwand. Nora spürt, dass sie ihr Glück erst finden wird, wenn sie in die Heimat ihres Vaters reist. Doch die Samen und ihre Kultur erscheinen ihr lange fremd. Bis sie auf den charismatischen Hundezüchter Mielat trifft. Gemeinsam mit ihm stößt sie auf die Geschichte von Áilu. Schon bald ahnt Nora, dass Áilus ungeheuerliches Schicksal eng mit ihrer eigenen Familiengeschichte verknüpft ist ...

Unberührte Landschaft, eine geheimnisvolle, lang unterdrückte Kultur und der Zauber des Nordlichts - der neue Roman von Christine Kabus erzählt vor der hinreißenden Kulisse Norwegens von der Sehnsucht nach Heimat und der Kraft der Liebe.

Weitere Norwegenromane von Christine Kabus: Das Lied des Nordwinds. Das Geheimnis der Fjordinsel. Das Geheimnis der Mittsommernacht. Im Land der weiten Fjorde. Insel der blauen Gletscher.

eBooks von beHEARTBEAT - Herzklopfen garantiert.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Die Sterne über Falkensee«

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Die Sterne über Falkensee

Lübbe | Westpreußen-Saga


Westpreußen 1925: Nach einer stürmischen Romanze geben sich Isabella von Bargelow und Kaufmann Julius Kirchner auf Gut Falkensee das Jawort. Wenige Jahre später fällt auf ihr Glück ein Schatten. Julius schließt sich der NSDAP an, und Isabella versteht ihren Mann nicht mehr. Dann entdeckt sie versteckt im Gutshaus eine Fremde. Ist es Julius` Geliebte? Als Isabella die Wahrheit erfährt, muss sie um ihre Familie bangen. Ist sie bereit, ihre Liebe und ihr Gewissen zu opfern, um Kinder und Heimat zu schützen?

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Das zweite Königreich«

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Das zweite Königreich

Bastei Lübbe | Helmsby-Reihe


England 1064: Ein Piratenüberfall setzt der unbeschwerten Kindheit des jungen Caedmon of Helmsby ein jähes Ende - ein Pfeil verletzt ihn so schwer, dass er zum Krüppel wird. Sein Vater schiebt ihn ab und schickt ihn in die normannische Heimat seiner Mutter. Zwei Jahre später kehrt Caedmon mit Herzog William und dessen Eroberungsheer zurück.

Nach der Schlacht von Hastings und Williams Krönung gerät Caedmon in eine Schlüsselposition, die er niemals wollte: Er wird zum Mittler zwischen Eroberern und Besiegten. In dieser Rolle schafft er sich erbitterte Feinde, doch er hat das Ohr des despotischen, oft grausamen Königs. Bis zu dem Tag, an dem William erfährt, wer die normannische Dame ist, die Caedmon liebt ...

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Water Beetles«

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The Water Beetles

Goose Lane Editions


Winner, 2018 Amazon Canada First Novel Award

Winner, 2018 McNally Robinson Book of the Year

Winner, 2018 Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction

Shortlisted, 2017 Governor General's Award for Fiction

Shortlisted, 2018 Eileen McTavish Sykes Award for Best First Book

A National Post Best Book of 2017

A Walter Scott Prize Academy Recommended Historical Novel of 2017

On CBC Books' list of writers to watch in 2018

The Leung family leads a life of secluded luxury in Hong Kong. But in December 1941, the Empire of Japan invades the colony. The family is quickly dragged into a spiral of violence, repression, and starvation. To survive, they entomb themselves and their friends in the Leung mansion. But this is only a temporary reprieve, and the Leungs are forced to send their children away.

The youngest boy, Chung-Man, escapes with some of his siblings, and together they travel deep into the countryside to avoid the Japanese invaders. Thrown into a new world, Chung-Man befriends a young couple who yearn to break free of their rural life. But their friendship ends when the Japanese arrive, and Chung-Man is once again taken captive. Unwittingly and willingly, he enters a new cycle of violence and punishment, until he finally breaks free from his captors and returns to Hong Kong.

Deeply scarred, Chung-Man drifts along respectfully and dutifully, enveloped by the unspoken vestiges of war. It is only as he leaves home once again — this time for university in America — that he finally glimpses a way to keep living with his troubled and divided self.

Written in restrained, yet beautiful and affecting prose, The Water Beetles is an engrossing story of adventure and survival. Based loosely on the diaries and stories of the author's father, this mesmerizing story captures the horror of war, through the eyes of a child, with unsettling and unerring grace.

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"Kaan is able to balance the bloodshed with beautiful imagery and detail."

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"Twelve-year-old Chung-Man transports the reader from the halcyon days of upper-class life in pre-war Hong Kong into the brutality of the Japanese occupation where cruelty has no limits. Written in clean, elegant prose, The Water Beetles is a powerful and gripping account of a young boy’s coming of age during that most harrowing of times. A most impressive debut."

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"I could not put this book down."

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"Michael Kaan’s spider-silken debut demands second read. [A] high-wire act of literary derring-do."

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"Kaan has succeeded in producing a work of lasting power. Introduced on these pages is a writer as skilled at crafting prose as he is at revealing the sufferings of war and lapsed time."

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"It is an understatement to say Kaan’s novel is an impressive debut. It immediately enters into the canon of coming-of-age stories, as powerful as any you can name."

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"Kaan has created a narrator who reveals his dramatic tale with such anguish and ironic restraint that truth-revealing consequences — the prickly truths of being inescapably human — are driven deeper into a reader’s heart. A work most deserving of serious attention."

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Michael Kaan was born in Winnipeg, the second child of a father from Hong Kong and a Canadian mother. He completed a degree in English from the University of Manitoba, later completing an MBA in Health Economics from the same institution. He has worked as a healthcare administrator since 2000, primarily in mental health and health research. He currently manages a mental health clinic. His father died in 2006, and Michael came into possession of his memoirs shortly thereafter. The Water Beetles is his first novel.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Death and Life of Strother Purcell«

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The Death and Life of Strother Purcell

Goose Lane Editions


The return of the western — with a definite Canadian twist. The man, the myth, the gun-toting legend.

The man, the myth, the one-eyed legend: a frontier epic for fans of Ron Rash and Cormac McCarthy.

In 1876, the fabled lawman Strother Purcell disappears into a winter storm in the mountains of British Columbia, while hunting down his outlawed half-brother. Sixteen years later, the wreck of Purcell resurfaces – derelict, homeless and one-eyed – in a San Francisco jail cell. And a failed journalist named Barrington Weaver conceives a grand redemptive plan. He will write Purcell's true-life story. All it requires is a final act…

What unfolds is an archetypal saga of obsession, lost love, treachery, and revenge, told in Ian Weir's trademark funny, fast, wickedly intelligent style. A deadpan revisionist Western, refracted through a Southern Gothic revenge tragedy, The Death and Life of Strother Purcell is a novel about two cursed brothers, a pair of eldritch orphans, the vexed nature of truth, and the yearnings of that treacherous sonofabitch the human heart.

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"A fascinating and insightful commentary on how stories are built and on our determination to see them come to light. Strother strides on the page — epic and tragic — a man trapped in the myths of manhood and gunslinging, a man of a bygone era who cannot allow bygones to be just that."

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"Masterfully crafted storytelling, witty and pacy and scratchy with grit. When it comes to the "Canadian Western," Ian Weir thrills and heartbreaks in similar ways as Guy Vanderhaeghe, and if that all sounds like a good time, it is."

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"A literary exegesis on truth disguised as rollicking, tragic Western entertainment. Cain and Abel and the Sisters Brothers got nothing on towering Strother Purcell and his club-footed half-brother. When lies are this well loved, they transform into truth and truth into history."

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"Weir takes every trope in the Western's playbook — the one-eyed avenging lawman, the feckless brother, tarts both with and without hearts, gunslingers, gimps, and gamblers — and makes of them something new and utterly wonderful. This wildly entertaining and witty yarn made me gasp, hoot, and holler."

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Ian Weir is a playwright, screenwriter, TV showrunner, and the author of two previously published novels. Daniel O'Thunder was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writer'’ Prize for Best First Book, as well as the Canadian Authors Association Award for fiction, the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, and the amazon.ca First Novel Award. Will Starling was longlisted for the International DUBLIN Literary Award and shortlisted for the Sunburst Award. Among his extensive television credits are his work as creator and showrunner of Arctic Air and as writer and executive producer of the acclaimed gangland miniseries, Dragon Boys.He has won two Geminis, four Leos, a Jessie, and a Writers Guild of Canada Screenwriting Award.

Born in North Carolina, Ian Weir grew up in Kamloops, British Columbia. He now lives near Vancouver.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Town That Drowned«

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The Town That Drowned

Goose Lane Editions


Winner, Commonwealth Book Prize, Canada and Europe, Frye Academy Award, and Margaret and John Savage First Book Award

Shortlisted, CLA Young Adult Book Award, Red Maple Award, and University of Canberra Book of the Year

Longlisted, IMPAC Dublin Award

Living with a weird brother in a small town can be tough enough. Having a spectacular fall through the ice at a skating party and nearly drowning are grounds for embarrassment. But having a vision and narrating it to the assembled crowd solidifies your status as an outcast.

What Ruby Carson saw during that fateful day was her entire town — buildings and people — floating underwater. Then an orange-tipped surveyor stake turns up in a farmer's field. Another is found in the cemetery. A man with surveying equipment is spotted eating lunch near Pokiok Falls. The residents of Haverton soon discover that a massive dam is being constructed and that most of their homes will be swallowed by the rising water. Suspicions mount, tempers flare, and secrets are revealed. As the town prepares for its own demise, 14-year-old Ruby Carson sees it all from a front-row seat.

Set in the 1960s, The Town That Drowned evokes the awkwardness of childhood, the thrill of first love, and the importance of having a place to call home. Deftly written in a deceptively unassuming style, Nason's keen insights into human nature and the depth of human attachment to place make this novel ripple in an amber tension of light and shadow.

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"Charming, wry, and believable ... Nason has a particular gift for introducing supporting characters with memorable anecdotes, each of which reads like a sparkling little gem of a short story ... Ruby's voice, vibrating with contradictory desires, [delivers] shot-to-the-heart moments of real humour and pathos."

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"[A] captivating debut novel ... many flashes of clever humour and felicitous, well-paced storytelling that keeps you engaged throughout."

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"If her debut novel, The Town That Drowned, is any indication, Riel Nason is a writer to watch. This tender tale about a New Brunswick village threatened by the provincial government's plan to build a dam has a ton of soul."

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"Riel Nason's debut novel establishes her as a writer with a bright future ... Nason's writing is warm and empathetic. She has a lovely ear for dialogue and her townspeople are well drawn. She also does a terrific job capturing the feel of a 1960s rural New Brunswick."

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"The writing is finely polished, the locale evocative, and her dialogue rings true. In Ruby, she nails the voice of youth."

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"An impressive first novel."

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"The Town That Drowned is not easily forgotten."

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"Nason writes with a keen logic and with the kind of wisdom that comes from an astute understanding of what it is to be human. It is a gift, and Nason brings this gift to the book's protagonist fourteen-year-old Ruby Carson ... From the smell of hot chocolate when Ruby regains consciousness from her fall, to the Nesbitt's Orange pop bottle sealed with canning wax, Nason imbues every scene with sensory delight. But anything of the quaint or peculiarly local in this book takes a back seat to the voice of Ruby Carson. She is one of a kind."

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"Fantastic ... I had such an emotional reaction ... The ending is so hopeful and uplifting. Highly recommended."

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"This is a lighthearted and well-written book that I would recommend to anyone."

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"[T]his is a vivid, intimate novel that works equally well for adult and young-adult readers. ... Nason's genius in this novel is not just to tell an important historical story that needed to be told but to find exactly the right perspective from which to tell it. ... The Town That Drowned is a warm, intimate story in which every character feels as real as someone you might meet on the street."

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"This is a richly detailed journey through a young woman's perspective, and the story flows like a gentle river as the reader watches a catastrophe unfold in slow motion. ... It's haunting and memorable, and simply a lovely read."

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"I loved it. It's Canadian historical fiction with a tiny touch of the paranormal."

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Riel Nason is a writer and textile artist. She is the author of three novels, one for middle-grade readers; a children’s picture book; and two books on quilting. The Town That Drowned was her debut novel. It won the Commonwealth Book Prize for Canada and Europe and the Margaret and John Savage First Book Award. She lives in Quispamsis, New Brunswick.

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Eine Räuberballade«

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Eine Räuberballade

Eichborn | Westerwald-Chronik


In ihrem dritten großen Westerwald-Roman nimmt Annegret Held uns mit ins späte 18. Jahrhundert, als brutale Räuberbanden die gesamte Region in Angst und Schrecken versetzten. Mitreißend, klug und höchst unterhaltsam erzählt sie von Hannes, einem aufstrebenden Möchtegern-Räuber, von seinem frommen und zunehmend verzweifelten Vater Wilhelm, von der mannstollen Magd Gertraud und von all den anderen Scholmerbachern, die dem harten Dorfleben tapfer die Stirn bieten. Großartige Heimatliteratur!

 
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