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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Connecting Canadians«

Connecting Canadians

Clement, AndrewGurstein, MichaelLongford, GrahamMoll, MaritaShade, Leslie Regan (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press


Connecting Canadians represents the work of the Community Research Alliance for Community Innovation and Networking (CRACIN), the largest national and international research effort to examine the burgeoning field of community informatics, a cross-disciplinary approach to the mobilization of information and communications technologies (ICT) for community change.

Funded for four years by the SSHRC's Initiative for the New Economy, CRACIN systematically studied a wide variety of Canadian community ICT initiatives, bringing perspectives from sociology, computer science, critical theory, women's studies, library and information sciences, and management studies to bear on networking technologies. A comprehensive thematic account of this in-depth research, Connecting Canadians will be an essential resource for NGOs, governments, the private sector, and multilateral agencies across the globe.

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Andrew Clement is a professor in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, with a cross-over appointment in the Department of Computer Science.

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Michael Gurstein is the director of the Center for Community Informatics Research, Training, and Development in Vancouver.

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Graham Longford has been a research fellow and coinvestigator for CRACIN and CWIRP.

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Marita Moll is a researcher and freelance writer who writes about telecommunications policy and community networking in Canada.

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Leslie Regan Shade is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Concordia University.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »repeater«

repeater

BookThug


SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2013 GERALD LAMPAND MEMORIAL AWARD

repeater is a poetic investigation into the coding, function, language, and structure of computer programming. Using the ASCII 8-bit binary code as an acrostic, each lower-case letter of the alphabet is arranged alongside the lines of the title poem. As a result, this poem "programs" an investigation of layered and digitalized language that is coded into the heart of the code itself. Appendixes to this code form supplementary studies, and deviate into additional problems and concepts at the convergence of poetry and computer programming. Ultimately, repeater reveals what happens when the creative variability of poetry is "inputted" into the rigid binaric structure of computer language.

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Praise for repeater:

Louis Zukofsky famously located poetry as upper level music, lower level speech. Andrew McEwan’s repeater moves between just those poles. The difference is that McEwan is tracking through the coded moments of a world of language where the lower level operates within the patterns of "information interchange” that increasingly dominate what’s left of the human and "authenticity marks obsolescent outline / to transform the set.” Remarkably, McEwan still makes it sing amidst the "unbound bits [that] float in gravity’s delay.” repeater is a terrific debut book that promises much more to come.

— Michael Boughn

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Andrew McEwan was born May 20, 1988.  He is the author of the chapbook Input / Output from Cactus Press. His writing was awarded the E.J. Pratt Poetry Medal. He is finishing his undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto where he has been the editor-in-chief at the Acta Victoriana Literary Journal and poetry editor at The Hart House Review. repeater is his first book.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Finale Vernetzung«

Finale Vernetzung

Bastei Entertainment


Gegenstände, die über das Internet kommunizieren, gar selbstständig Entscheidungen treffen - das schien eher zum Gedankengut von Nerds und Science-Fiction-Fans zu passen als zu einem realistischen Bild unserer Wirklichkeit. Inzwischen haben die Visionen Einzug in unseren Alltag gehalten - über Sportarmbänder, vernetzte Automobile und Haushaltsgeräte, die sich via Smartphone steuern lassen. Was bedeutet diese Entwicklung für uns? Macht sie unser Leben besser oder gefährdet sie es?

Philip N. Howard forscht seit vielen Jahren über den Einfluss der digitalen Medien auf das politische Leben. Er zeigt, wie wir uns vor den Gefahren schützen, aber auch die Potenziale nutzen.

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"Finale Vernetzung ist ein spannender Blick in die Zukunft." dpa, 14.01.2017

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