Logo weiterlesen.de
Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Importance of Being Monogamous«

Leseprobe vom

The Importance of Being Monogamous

Athabasca University Press and University of Alberta Press | The West Unbound


Sarah Carter reveals the pioneering efforts of the government, legal, and religious authorities to impose the “one man, one woman”model of marriage upon Mormons and Aboriginal people in Western Canada. This lucidly written, richly researched book revises what we know about marriage and the gendered politics of late 19th century reform, shifts our understanding of Aboriginal history during that time, and brings together the fields of Indigenous and migrant history in new and important ways.

---

“This innovative book brings together a wide range of subjects and sources to pursue a theme not previously articulated in a single work. Although the pressures increasingly placed on First Nations people, from the 1800s onward, to marry in conventional church ceremonies and to eschew polygamy have often been discussed, the extent to which other groups were pressed to conform to mainstream practices is little known…. Carter demonstrates that monogamy was not just an ‘Indian’ issue; Canadian authorities also challenged non-conforming minorities of European background. These groups, often small and dispersed, were less successful than established Aboriginal communities in subverting and resisting the pressures imposed on their modes of marriage and divorce.”

---

"The importance of monogamy was not something readily evident to much of the varied population of 19th-century Western Canada, Edmonton author and University of Alberta historian Sarah Carter points out in her new study of marriage and nation building in the old West.

Carter's fourth book, which recently made the longlist for the prestigious Cundill International Prize in History, begins by reflecting on the currency of this subject during the seemingly interminable current debate on family values and same-sex marriage. Carter sees much of this debate rooted in "a wistful nostalgia for an imaginary simpler time, when gender roles were firmly in place with the husband as family head and provider, and the wife as the dependent partner -- obedient, unobtrusive, and submissive."

---

Sarah Carter is professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair in both the Department of History and Classics and the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on the critical era that began in the late 19th century when Aboriginal people were dispossessed and a new population established in Western Canada.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Icon, Brand, Myth«

Leseprobe vom

Icon, Brand, Myth

Foran, Max (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound


An investigation of the meanings and iconography of the Stampede: an invented tradition that takes over the city of Calgary for ten days every July. Since 1923, archetypal “Cowboys and Indians” are seen again at the chuckwagon races, on the midway, and throughout Calgary. Each essay in this collection examines a facet of the experience—from the images on advertising posters to the ritual of the annual parade. This study of the Calgary Stampede as a social phenomenon reveals the history and sociology of the city of Calgary and the social construction of identity for western Canada as a whole.

---

" ... a great beginning for a more thoughtful consideration of the Calgary Stampede and its place in Western Canadian culture."

---

Max Foran is a Professor in the Faculty of Communication and History at the University of Calgary. He has written extensively on various western Canadian urban, rural, and cultural topics, most recently on ranching, urban growth, and sustainability.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The West and Beyond«

Leseprobe vom

The West and Beyond

Finkel, AlvinCarter, SarahFortna, Peter (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound: Social and Cultural Studies


The West and Beyond explores the state of Western Canadian history, showcasing the research interests of a new generation of scholars while charting new directions for the future and stimulating further interrogation of our past. This dynamic collection encourages dialogue among generations of historians of the West, and among practitioners of diverse approaches to the past. It also reflects a broad range of disciplinary and professional boundaries, offering new ways to understand the West.

---

“The essays in this volume are a fascinating snapshot of current scholarship about western Canada and reveal a crop of emerging historians who have expanded the reach of Western Canadian Studies beyond its earlier regional and analytical confines.”

---

“The depth and breadth of the essay in The West and Beyond indicate a renewed vitality in Western Canadian history, reconstituted as a field rooted in a particular geographic space, but at the same time attuned to broader sets of processes and other spaces.”

---

Alvin Finkel has taught Canadian history at Athabasca University since 1978. His main areas of research and teaching are the history of social policy, labour history, and Western Canadian history. Best known for his co-authorship with Margaret Conrad of the two-volume History of the Canadian Peoples, his other publications include The Social Credit Phenomenon in Alberta and Our Lives: Canada After 1945. His latest book is Social Policy and Practice in Canada: A History.

---

Sarah Carter is Professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair in both the Department of History and Classics and the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Recent books include The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada and Montana Women Homesteaders: A Field of One's Own.

---

Peter Fortna is a historical and traditional land use consultant in the Fort McMurray area. His research interests include Aboriginal history, traditional environmental knowledge, and public history. He was also the co-organizer for "The West and Beyond: Historians Past, Present and Future" conference, on which The West and Beyond is based.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Recollecting«

Leseprobe vom

Recollecting

Carter, SarahMcCormack, Patricia A (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound: Social and Cultural Studies


This rich collection of essays illuminates the lives of late-eighteenth-century to mid-twentieth-century Aboriginal women, women who have been overlooked in sweeping narratives of the history of the West.

Some essays focus on individuals—a trader, a performer, a non-human woman. Other essays examine cohorts of women—wives, midwives, seamstresses, nuns. Authors look beyond the documentary record and standard representations of women, drawing on records generated by the women themselves, including their beadwork, other material culture, and oral histories. Exploring the constraints and boundaries these women encountered, the authors engage with difficult and important questions of gender, race, and identity. Collectively these essays demonstrate the complexity of "contact zone" interactions, and they enrich and challenge dominant narratives about histories of the Canadian Northwest.

---

“More than emphasizing an active role for Aboriginal women in history, Atkinson, Barman, and their fellow contributors offer highly readable biographies showcasing hybridity, resiliency, contradictory historical experiences, and, above all, the diversity of Aboriginal women’s identities.”

---

"An exciting new collection that spans over 200 years of Canadian history…. The central themes are primarily the negotiation of fluid identities within a changing and dynamic context and the importance of looking beyond the archive to recover what, the authors argue, lies beyond the colonizing gaze. […] Recollecting provides a thoroughly readable trove of information and includes some useful illustrations of many of the individuals and of some of the handiwork under discussion. The well-researched articles as a whole, remind us as researchers to seek diligently to capture voices present in objects, in stories, and in recollections not found in any traditional textual archive.”

---

“The fact that the best essays rely not on journals or books written by women (which would thus make them elite and somewhat unusual) but on varied sources that discuss them or that they left behind, such as dictated reminiscences, makes these articles more thought-provoking and impressive. Even when the book focuses on more famous representatives, such as Catherine Auger, Frances Nickawa, or Anahareo, the essays present them as multidimensional figures who changed over time and embraced and rejected cultural norms.”

---

“This collection’s introduction and twelve articles can quite rightly be seen as one grand recovery mission, a giant step toward increasing dramatically the complexity of western/colonial history through the lives of Aboriginal women.”

---

“Sarah Carter and Patricia McCormack unsettle the dominant, white-settler narrative of Canadian history while also contributing in a unique way to the genre of women's historical biography.”

---

Sarah Carter is Professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair in both the Department of History and Classics and the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Her most recent books are The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada and Montana Women Homesteaders: A Field of One’s Own.

---

Patricia A. McCormack is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on Aboriginal peoples of the northwestern Plains, northern Canada, and Scotland, in the contexts of the fur trade and the expansion of state. She has published extensively about Fort Chipewyan, including a new book to be published shortly by UBC Press.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance«

Leseprobe vom

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance

Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound: Social and Cultural Studies


Canada is regularly presented as a country where liberalism has ensured freedom and equality for all. Yet with the expansion of settlers into the First Nations territories that became southern Alberta and BC, liberalism proved to be an exclusionary rather than inclusionary force. Between 1877 and 1927, government officials, police officers, church representatives, ordinary settlers, and many others operated to exclude and reform Indigenous people. Presenting Anglo-Canadian liberal capitalist values and structures and interests as normal, natural, and beyond reproach devalued virtually every aspect of Indigenous cultures. This book explores the means used to facilitate and justify colonization, their effects on Indigenous economic, political, social, and spiritual lives, and how they were resisted.

---

"As an introduction to postmodern ideas and analysis, the contribution Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance makes to Canadian Aboriginal history is significant. Sophisticated, thoroughly researched, and readable, it provides a very useful framework for analyzing familiar events in the history of Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relations in Canada and colonialism everywhere."

---

“Smith concludes that ‘disciplinary surveillance’ of aboriginal people as employed by the federal government has persisted to the present day, despite the evidence of sporadic resistance by individuals and groups. What makes this book even more timely, is that the Canadian government continues to monitor the activities of aboriginal people who resist incursions on their indigenous rights and territories.”

---

Keith D. Smith is Chair of the Department of First Nations Studies and teaches in the Department of History at Vancouver Island University in Nanaimo, British Columbia.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Goodlands«

Leseprobe vom

Goodlands

Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound: Social and Cultural Studies


Amer-European settlement of the Great Plains transformed bountiful Native soil into pasture and cropland, distorting the prairie ecosystem as it was understood and used by the peoples who originally populated the land. Settlers justified this transformation with the unexamined premise of deficiency, according to which the Great Plains region was inadequate in flora and fauna and the region lacking in modern civilization. Drawing on history, sociology, art, and economic theory, Frances W. Kaye counters the argument of deficiency, pointing out that, in its original ecological state, no region can possibly be incomplete. Goodlands examines the settlers' misguided theory, discussing the ideas that shaped its implementation, the forces that resisted it, and Indigenous ideologies about what it meant to make good use of the land. By suggesting methods for redeveloping the Great Plains that are founded on native cultural values, Goodlands serves the region in the context of a changing globe.

---

“…Kaye synthesizes knowledge of the Great Plains with an almost stunning interdisciplinarity—the disciplines she draws from really are too many to list here—and, equally important to my mind, an unwavering binational Canada-US focus.”

---

Frances W. Kaye is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Nebraska. She has held two Fulbright Teaching Program positions, in Montreal and in Calgary, the first of which resulted in the book Hiding the Audience: Arts and Arts Institutions on the Prairies. Kaye divides her time between a farmstead outside Lincoln, Nebraska, and a house in Calgary, so that she may always be close to the prairie land that drives her research.Face the North Wind (1975). This manuscript came to light after his passing in 1999.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen

Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Expansive Discourses«

Leseprobe vom

Expansive Discourses

Athabasca University Press | The West Unbound: Social and Cultural Studies


A groundbreaking study of urban sprawl in Calgary after the Second World War. The interactions of land developers and the local government influenced how the pattern grew: developers met market demands and optimized profits by building houses as efficiently as possible, while the City had to consider wider planning constraints and infrastructure costs. Foran examines the complexity of their interactions from a historical perspective, why each party acted as it did, and where each can be criticized.

---

Max Foran is a Professor in the Faculty of Communication and Culture at the University of Calgary. He has written extensively on various western Canadian urban, rural, and cultural topics, most recently on ranching, urban growth, and sustainability.

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen