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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Transparent Lives«

Leseprobe vom

Transparent Lives

Bennett, Colin J.Haggerty, Kevin D.Lyon, DavidSteeves, Valerie (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press


Although most Canadians are familiar with surveillance cameras and airport security, relatively few are aware of the extent to which the potential for surveillance is now embedded in virtually every aspect of our lives. We cannot walk down a city street, register for a class, pay with a credit card, hop on an airplane, or make a telephone call without data being captured and processed. Where does such information go? Who makes use of it, and for what purpose? Is the loss of control over our personal information merely the price we pay for using social media and other forms of electronic communication, or should we be wary of systems that make us visible—and thus vulnerable—to others as never before?

The work of a multidisciplinary research team, Transparent Lives explains why and how surveillance is expanding—mostly unchecked—into every facet of our lives. Through an investigation of the major ways in which both government and private sector organizations gather, monitor, analyze, and share information about ordinary citizens, the volume identifies nine key trends in the processing of personal data that together raise urgent questions of privacy and social justice. Intended not only to inform but to make a difference, the volume is deliberately aimed at a broad audience, including legislators and policymakers, journalists, civil liberties groups, educators, and, above all, the reading public.

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“The best defences against mass surveillance, and the power citizens are relinquishing to the state and economic actors, are books such as Transparent Lives, whose mission is to raise awareness and provide concrete actionable information. It is strongly recommended to all readers with an interest in the impact of information technology on our society.”

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Colin Bennett is a professor in the Department of Political Science at the

University of Victoria. His research has focused on the comparative analysis

of surveillance technologies and privacy protection policies at the domestic

and international levels. In addition to numerous scholarly and newspaper

articles, he has published six books, including The Privacy Advocates: Resisting

the Spread of Surveillance (MIT Press, 2008), as well as policy reports on privacy

protection for Canadian and international agencies. He is currently a coinvestigator

with the The New Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting.

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Kevin D. Haggerty is editor of the Canadian Journal of Sociology and professor

of sociology and criminology at the University of Alberta. His recent work

is in the area of surveillance, governance, policing, and risk. Together with

coauthor Aaron Doyle, he is currently writing a book titled 65 Ways to Screw

Up in Graduate School, which conveys a series of professional lessons for the

next generation of graduate students.

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David Lyon is director of the Surveillance Studies Centre, Queen’s Research

Chair in Surveillance Studies, and professor in the Department of Sociology

and the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University. Since 2008, he has led The New

Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting research team that produced

the present volume. Some of his recent books are Liquid Surveillance (cowritten

with Zygmunt Bauman; Polity Press, 2013), The Routledge Handbook of

Surveillance Studies (coedited with Kirstie Ball and Kevin Haggerty; Routledge,

2012), Identifying Citizens: ID Cards as Surveillance (Polity Press, 2009), and

Surveillance Studies: An Overview (Polity Press, 2007). He is a cofounder of

the journal Surveillance and Society and the Surveillance Studies Network.

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Valerie Steeves is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology

at the University of Ottawa. She has spoken and written extensively on privacy.

She is currently the principal investigator of the eGirls Project (funded

by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada), which

studies the performance of gender on social media, and the lead researcher

for the Young Canadians in a Wired World research project (funded by the

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada).

 
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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Vivre à nu«

Leseprobe vom

Vivre à nu

Bennett, Colin J.Haggerty, Kevin D.Lyon, DavidSteeves, Valerie (Hrsg.) | Athabasca University Press


Nombre de Canadiens savent que les organismes du gouvernement s’adonnent à de la surveillance de masse en utilisant les données téléphoniques et électroniques. Néanmoins, peu d’entre eux sont réellement conscients de l’influence réelle que cette surveillance a sur presque tous les aspects de leur vie quotidienne. Aujourd’hui, nous ne pouvons faire une promenade au centre-ville, assister à un cours, payer au moyen d’une carte de crédit, monter à bord d’un avion ou faire un appel sans que des données soient capturées et traitées. Où cette information s’en va-t-elle? Qui l’utilise? Qui en sort gagnant et qui en sort perdant? Est-ce que le prix à payer pour utiliser les médias sociaux et d’autres moyens de communication électronique est de desserrer notre emprise sur nos renseignements personnels? Au contraire, devrions-nous nous méfier des systèmes qui nous rendent plus que jamais visibles et, par conséquent, vulnérables aux yeux des autres?

Vivre à nu est l’œuvre d’une équipe de recherche multidisciplinaire et explique comment la surveillance s’accroît – pratiquement sans que personne y porte attention – dans toutes les sphères de notre vie. En analysant les principaux moyens employés par le secteur public et le secteur privé pour recueillir, faire le suivi, analyser et échanger des renseignements au sujet des citoyens ordinaires, les auteurs de l’ouvrage ont dégagé neuf grandes tendances dans le traitement des données personnelles. D’ailleurs, collectivement, ces neuf grandes tendances soulèvent des questions pressantes au sujet de la vie privée et de la justice sociale. Cet ouvrage vise non seulement à informer, mais également à changer le cours des choses. Il cible intentionnellement un grand public : les décideurs, les journalistes, les groupes de défense des libertés civiles, les enseignants et, par-dessus tout, les lecteurs du grand public.

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Colin Bennett is a professor in the Department of Political Science at the

University of Victoria. His research has focused on the comparative analysis

of surveillance technologies and privacy protection policies at the domestic

and international levels. In addition to numerous scholarly and newspaper

articles, he has published six books, including The Privacy Advocates: Resisting

the Spread of Surveillance (MIT Press, 2008), as well as policy reports on privacy

protection for Canadian and international agencies. He is currently a coinvestigator

with the The New Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting.

---

Kevin D. Haggerty is editor of the Canadian Journal of Sociology and professor

of sociology and criminology at the University of Alberta. His recent work

is in the area of surveillance, governance, policing, and risk. Together with

coauthor Aaron Doyle, he is currently writing a book titled 65 Ways to Screw

Up in Graduate School, which conveys a series of professional lessons for the

next generation of graduate students.

---

David Lyon is director of the Surveillance Studies Centre, Queen’s Research

Chair in Surveillance Studies, and professor in the Department of Sociology

and the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University. Since 2008, he has led The New

Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting research team that produced

the present volume. Some of his recent books are Liquid Surveillance (cowritten

with Zygmunt Bauman; Polity Press, 2013), The Routledge Handbook of

Surveillance Studies (coedited with Kirstie Ball and Kevin Haggerty; Routledge,

2012), Identifying Citizens: ID Cards as Surveillance (Polity Press, 2009), and

Surveillance Studies: An Overview (Polity Press, 2007). He is a cofounder of

the journal Surveillance and Society and the Surveillance Studies Network.

---

Valerie Steeves is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology

at the University of Ottawa. She has spoken and written extensively on privacy.

She is currently the principal investigator of the eGirls Project (funded

by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada), which

studies the performance of gender on social media, and the lead researcher

for the Young Canadians in a Wired World research project (funded by the

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada).

 
Leseprobe lesen
Web-Ansicht
Download
EPUB
Kaufen