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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Enemy in the House«

Enemy in the House

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


During the American Revolution, a woman fights to save her family. Several years have passed since American colonists rose up against the tyranny of King George III, yet the war has no end in sight. As the struggle drags on, colonial commander George Washington's army supports itself by seizing land from those loyal to the Crown. In South Carolina, rebel leaders have their eyes on the Mallam estate, whose owner has fled to Jamaica, leaving his daughter Amity to manage the plantation. As a last-ditch effort to save her family's land, she marries Simon Mallam, a cousin and a rebel, then travels to Jamaica to learn if her father is alive or dead. There she finds no less turmoil than she left behind. Her father's sugar plantation, Mallam Penn, is in danger. If the Mallam family is to have any future in the new world, one woman must stave off the armies of two nations.

Review Quote:

"Commendable." - The New York Times -

"Intriguing." - Houston Chronicle -

"One of the most thorough and ingenious plotters in the trade." - The New Yorker -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Fair Warning«

Fair Warning

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


Trapped in an evil man's house, a young wife searches for an escape. Though she can't admit it to anyone, the day of her husband's car accident is one of the best days in Marcia Godden's short life. After three years of marriage to Ivan, she has seen his darkest side, and now his very footsteps are enough to make her shudder. A guilty thrill goes through her when she hears of his accident, only to be replaced by terror when she learns that her husband is going to live. For four glorious, peaceful weeks, Ivan remains in the hospital. In the relief of this temporary freedom, Marcia confides in her neighbor, cheerful, handsome Robert Copley, and soon falls in love with him. Not long after her husband's return from the hospital, Marcia finds Ivan stabbed in the chest, and police suspicion falls on her. To save herself from prison, she must prove herself innocent of the murder of the one man she most wanted dead.

Review Quote:

"Mrs. Eberhart has written many excellent mystery stories, but in none of them has she presented a more baffling problem than in this one." - The New York Times -

"This season's model detective story ... Airtight." - The New Yorker -

"Mignon Eberhart's name on mysteries is like sterling on silver." - Miami News -

"One of America's favorite writers." - Mary Higgins Clark -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Cases of Susan Dare«

The Cases of Susan Dare

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


A mystery author finds her knowledge of murder put to practical use. Inside the lovely head of Susan Dare, grisly murder lurks. A mystery author who makes her living providing tidy solutions to imaginary crimes, Dare is enjoying a much-needed vacation when the mood at her host's house turns sour. Ugly secrets lurk in the Frame family's past, and jealousy stirs beneath the surface of their tranquil country estate. Dare makes plans to leave before her hosts turn on each other, but she is too late. On the morning of her departure, a gunshot echoes through the fog. Only a beautiful author with a head full of murder mysteries can pinpoint the killer. In this handful of elegant, classic stories, Mignon Eberhart's amateur detective proves her worth time and time again. Decades before Murder, She Wrote, Eberhart realized that those who write mysteries can solve them too.

Review Quote:

"Curious cases ... with singularly elusive clues and equally elusive motives ... Eberhart brings out the element of horror to the full." - The New York Times -

"You can't beat Mignon Eberhart." - New York Herald Tribune -

"One of the great ladies of twentieth-century mystery fiction." - John Jakes, author of the Kent Family Chronicles -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Hangman's Whip«

The Hangman's Whip

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


A Chicago socialite braves death to save her beloved from the gallows. Search Abbott is high over Chicago when Howland proposes marriage, but her heart is far away. Since childhood she has loved Richard Bohan, and her passion has not dimmed in the three years since he made the mistake of marrying Eve. Howland has few kind words for Richard, but Search's heart cannot be moved. She declines him, and leaves to visit her Aunt Ludmilla, a kindly old woman who claims she is being poisoned. She finds Richard staying at Ludmilla's estate, and all her old feelings come rushing forth. His marriage is finished, he says, as he takes Search in his arms. But joy is fleeting - Eve will never let him go. Search's hatred for her rival evaporates the moment she finds Eve dangling from a hangman's noose. The woman was murdered, and the police are going to take Richard away.

Review Quote:

"The suspense ... mounts steadily ... Mignon Eberhart, who has written many excellent mystery stories, has seldom, if ever, produced one better than The Hangman's Whip." - The New York Times -

"Frilly stuff built on a sound structure, with love abounding." - The New Yorker -

"Mignon Eberhart's name on mysteries is like sterling on silver." - Miami News -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Call After Midnight«

Call After Midnight

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


A woman battles to protect her ex-husband from a murder charge. The phone rings just after twelve. Jenny Vleedam knows it cannot be anyone but Peter, and she tries to let it ring. He left her for another woman - a vicious trollop called Fiora - and Jenny has too much self-respect to let him kick her around anymore. But she answers anyway, and hears the words she has been longing for: Fiora has been shot. But as often as she has fantasized about something happening to the woman who stole her husband, now Jenny feels only fear - fear that the police might not believe Peter's story that Fiora was the one holding the gun. Not knowing if the woman is dead or alive, Jenny rushes to Peter's side. Guilty or innocent, they will never be apart again.

Review Quote:

"[Eberhart is] number one ... Engrossing." - New York Herald Tribune -

"Old pro Mignon G. Eberhart tells one of her better mystery-romances in Call After Midnight." - The New York Times -

"One of the best mystifiers in America." - Gertrude Stein -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Danger in the Dark«

Danger in the Dark

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


On the eve of her wedding night, a bride-to-be loses her fiancé. Dennis comes home as soon as he learns that Daphne is about to marry. Though they are both Havilands, raised in the same house, she is no more than a distant cousin, not related by blood, and he has loved her since they were young. He arrives in Chicago the night before the wedding, determined to stop her from giving Ben Brewer her hand. Their passion flares, and she agrees to meet him that night to plan their future together. Both lovers arrive in time for the rendezvous, but there is another surprise: Brewer's bloody corpse. The evidence against Dennis and Daphne is insurmountable. Fight as they may to evade police suspicion, the hangman's noose slips ever tighter around their necks. They are finally together - but will they be joined for eternity at the altar, or the gallows?

Review Quote:

"Any story by Mrs. Eberhart is sure to be good, and this one is certain to add to her reputation." - The New York Times -

"A star writer." - H. R. F. Keating, author of Crime and Mystery: The 100 Best Books -

"One of America's favorite writers." - Mary Higgins Clark -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »The Chiffon Scarf«

The Chiffon Scarf

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


A woman finds herself caught at the terrible intersection of love and business. Averill Blaine should have been married years ago, but Eden Shore stole her fiancé Noel's heart. Eden, a fashion model, needed only a few weeks with Noel before he broke his engagement and proposed to her instead, but she never went through with the marriage. Years later, Averill has found a new fiancé, and nothing - not Eden, not even murder - will get in her way. Eden goes to Averill's wedding in hopes of seducing Noel once more. As the two couples circle warily, death intrudes - in the shape of a suspicious airplane crash that kills Averill's uncle. He is an expert pilot, but no amount of skill can stop the flames that leap from his engine as he crests 15,000 feet. Still, Averill and Eden are determined to say "I do", no matter how many die on their way to the altar.

Review Quote:

"Exciting ... a good Story ... lush." - The New York Times -

"Superb." - The New Yorker -

"Mignon Eberhart's name on mysteries is like sterling on silver." - Miami News -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Escape the Night«

Escape the Night

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


While visiting her sister, a woman becomes ensnared in a cursed house. Serena's last memories of California are of her sister Amanda's wedding to Sutton Condit, a wealthy rancher from Monterey's oldest family. But when she remembers those days, she doesn't think of the bride but instead dreams of Jem, a sturdy young man who won her heart so completely that, when she couldn't have him, she fled to New York. Four years later she returns for a visit, and Jem is as charming as ever. He hasn't changed, but everything else on the Condit ranch has. Bitterness has crept into Amanda's entourage, and strange secrets pollute the fine California air. Something terrible is afoot in the Condit mansion, and Serena has just begun to sense it when Sutton's aunt tumbles off a cliff near the house. The old woman's plunge seems like an accident until more murders follow. Nothing can protect Serena from the menace that haunts Monterey.

Review Quote:

"Suspense to the very end." - The New York Times -

"You can't beat Mignon Eberhart." - New York Herald Tribune -

"One of the great ladies of twentieth-century mystery fiction." - John Jakes, author of the Kent Family Chronicles -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Hasty Wedding«

Hasty Wedding

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


On the day of her wedding, a bride's ex-lover is found shot dead. In January, Dorcas Whipple was on the cusp of marrying Ronald Drew. One month later, she prepares to walk down the aisle, but Ronald will not be the groom after all. Her family decided he is unsuitable, a fortune hunter, and though Dorcas fought them, in the end she could not resist the pleas of her invalid mother. As she prepares to marry the steady, dependable Jevan Locke instead, she tries to put Ronald out of her mind. But when Ronald calls her the night before her wedding, she rushes to his side. Resisting her passion, Dorcas refuses Ronald's final plea for her hand. The next morning, when he is found shot dead, Dorcas is the only suspect. If her wedding goes ahead, will the bride wear white, or pinstripes?

Review Quote:

"The best of Mignon Eberhart." - The New York Times -

"Entertaining." - The New Yorker -

"One of the best mystifiers in America." - Gertrude Stein -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over a nearly six decade-long career. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, trading English essays to her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While The Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930's was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart was writing romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938) were adapted as films. Made a Mystery Writers of America grandmaster in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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Cover zur kostenlosen eBook-Leseprobe von »Another Woman's House«

Another Woman's House

Mysterious Press at Bastei Entertainment


A young girl is consumed by love for a tortured married man. Myra has lived at Thorne House for so long that she almost feels part of the family. Orphaned at a young age, she has never known another home, and yet it is time for her to leave. She is burning with an irresistible passion for Richard, the man of the house, and she knows that her love can never be fulfilled. For Richard is married to Alice, and Alice is guilty of murder. Myra knows that Richard is too noble to ask an incarcerated woman for a divorce, but on the eve of her departure he surprises her, confessing that he loves her in return. Just as Myra's future happiness seems assured, Alice returns to crush it. The convicted killer is back at Thorne House, and blood will follow in her wake.

Review Quote:

"A novel in which the love element and the murder mystery are so inextricably entwined that they cannot be considered separately." - The New York Times -

"Complex." - The New Yorker -

"A star writer." - H. R. F. Keating, author of Crime and Mystery: The 100 Best Books -

Biographical note:

Mignon G. Eberhart (1899-1996) wrote dozens of mystery novels over nearly sixty years. Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, she began writing in high school, swapping English essays with her fellow students in exchange for math homework. She attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, and in the 1920s began writing fiction in her spare time, publishing her first novel, The Patient in Room 18, in 1929. With the follow-up, While the Patient Slept (1931), she won a $5,000 Scotland Yard Prize, and by the end of the 1930s she was one of the most popular female mystery writers on the planet. Before Agatha Christie ever published a Miss Marple novel, Eberhart wrote romantic crime fiction with female leads. Eight of her books, including While the Patient Slept and Hasty Wedding (1938), were adapted for film. Elected a Mystery Writers of America Grand Master in 1971, Eberhart continued publishing roughly a book a year until the 1980s. Her final novel, Three Days for Emeralds, was published in 1988.

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